Use these links to rapidly review the document
Table of Contents
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

(Mark One)    

ý

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For The Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2013

or

o

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For The Transition Period From                      To                     

Commission file number 001-34877

CoreSite Realty Corporation
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Maryland
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  27-1925611
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

1001 17th Street, Suite 500
Denver, CO

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

80202
(Zip Code)

(866) 777-2673
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)

          Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of Class   Name of Exchange On Which Registered
Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share   New York Stock Exchange
7.25% Series A Cumulative Redeemable   New York Stock Exchange
Preferred Stock, $0.01 par value per share    

          Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

          Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes o    No ý

          Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o    No ý

          Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý    No o

          Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý    No o

          Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulations S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment of this Form 10-K. ý

          Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

Large accelerated filer o   Accelerated filer ý   Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a
smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o

          Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes o    No ý

          The aggregate market value of common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $483.0 million as of June 28, 2013, the last business day of the registrant's most recently completed second fiscal quarter. For purposes of the foregoing calculation, all directors and executive officers of the registrant and holders of more than 10% of the registrant's common equity are assumed to be affiliates of the registrant. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes.

          As of February 12, 2014, there were 21,329,013 shares of the registrant's Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share, outstanding.

          DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

          Portions of the registrant's definitive proxy statement to be issued in conjunction with the registrant's 2014 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which is expected to be filed not later than 120 days after the registrant's fiscal year ended December 31, 2013, are incorporated by reference in Part III of this report.

   


Table of Contents


Table of Contents

 
  Page  

PART I

    4  

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

    4  

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

    17  

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

    39  

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

    39  

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

    40  

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

    40  

PART II

   
41
 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

    41  

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

    43  

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

    45  

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

    57  

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

    58  

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

    90  

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

    90  

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

    91  

PART III

   
92
 

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    92  

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

    92  

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

    92  

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

    92  

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES

    92  

PART IV

   
93
 

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

    93  

SIGNATURES

   
97
 

Exhibit 21.1

       

Exhibit 23.1

       

Exhibit 31.1

       

Exhibit 31.2

       

Exhibit 32.1

       

Exhibit 32.2

       

2


Table of Contents

Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

        This Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2013 (this "Annual Report"), together with other statements and information publicly disseminated by our company, contains certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 ("PSLRA"), namely Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"). We intend such forward-looking statements to be covered by the safe harbor provisions for forward-looking statements contained in the PSLRA and include this statement for purposes of complying with these safe harbor provisions.

        In particular, statements pertaining to our capital resources, portfolio performance, business strategies and results of operations contain forward-looking statements. You can identify forward-looking statements by the use of forward-looking terminology such as "believes," "expects," "may," "will," "should," "seeks," "intends," "plans," "pro forma" or "anticipates" or the negative of these words and phrases or similar words or phrases that are predictions of or indicate future events or trends and that do not relate solely to historical matters. You can also identify forward-looking statements by discussions of strategy, plans or intentions. Such statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions and are not guarantees of future performance, which may be affected by known and unknown risks, trends, uncertainties and factors that are beyond our control. Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary materially from those anticipated, estimated or projected. The following factors, among others, could cause actual results and future events to differ materially from those set forth or contemplated in the forward-looking statements: (i) the geographic concentration of our data centers in certain markets and any adverse developments in local economic conditions or the demand for data center space in these markets; (ii) fluctuations in interest rates and increased operating costs; (iii) difficulties in identifying properties to acquire and completing acquisitions; (iv) the significant competition in our industry and an inability to lease vacant space, renew existing leases or release space as leases expire; (v) lack of sufficient customer demand to realize expected returns on our investments to expand our property portfolio; (vi) decreased revenue from costs and disruptions associated with any failure of our physical infrastructure or services; (vii) our ability to lease available space to existing or new customers; (viii) our failure to obtain necessary outside financing; (ix) our failure to qualify or maintain our status as a REIT; (x) financial market fluctuations; (xi) changes in real estate and zoning laws and increases in real property tax rates; (xii) delays or disruptions in third-party network connectivity; (xiii) service failures or price increases by third party power suppliers; (xiv) inability to renew net leases on the data center properties we lease; and (xv) other factors affecting the real estate industry generally.

        In addition, important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements include the risk factors in Item 1A. "Risk Factors" and elsewhere in this Annual Report. New risks and uncertainties arise from time to time, and we cannot predict those events or how they might affect us. We assume no obligation to update any forward-looking statements after the date of this Annual Report, except as required by applicable law. Given these risks and uncertainties, investors should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements as a prediction of actual results.

        When we use the terms "we," "us," "our," "the Company," "CoreSite" and "our company" in this Annual Report, we are referring to CoreSite Realty Corporation, a Maryland corporation, together with our consolidated subsidiaries, including CoreSite, L.P., a Delaware limited partnership of which we are the sole general partner and which we refer to as "our Operating Partnership."

3


Table of Contents


PART I

ITEM 1.    BUSINESS

The Company

        CoreSite Realty Corporation delivers network-dense, cloud-enabled, enterprise-class data center products and services across eight key North American markets. We connect, protect and deliver a reliable performance environment and continued operation of mission-critical data and IT infrastructure for more than 750 of the world's leading enterprises and Internet, private networking, mobility, and cloud service providers. Across 16 high-performance data centers, we help customers grow their businesses, by establishing connection, running performance-sensitive applications and securing their crucial data devices. CoreSite Realty Corporation, a Maryland corporation, completed our initial public offering of common stock on September 23, 2010 ("IPO"). We operate as a real estate investment trust ("REIT") for federal income tax purposes and conduct certain activities through our taxable REIT subsidiaries.

Our Business

        We are a fully integrated, self-administered, and self-managed real estate investment trust. Through our controlling interest in our Operating Partnership, we are engaged in the business of ownership, acquisition, construction and management of strategically located data centers in some of the largest and fastest growing data center markets in the United States, including the New York, Northern Virginia (including Washington D.C.) and San Francisco Bay areas, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, Denver and Miami.

        Data centers are highly specialized and secure buildings that house networking, storage and communications technology infrastructure, including servers, storage devices, switches, routers and fiber optic transmission equipment. These buildings are designed to provide the power, cooling and network connectivity necessary to efficiently operate this mission-critical equipment. Data centers located at points where many communications networks converge can also function as interconnection hubs where customers are able to connect to multiple networks and exchange traffic with each other. Our data centers feature advanced reliable and efficient power, cooling and security systems, including twenty-four-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week security staffing, and many are points of network interconnection that provide the ecosystems our customers need to meet their own competitive challenges and business goals. We believe we have the flexibility and scalability to satisfy the full spectrum of our customers' growth requirements and corresponding data center needs by providing data center space ranging in size from an entire building or large dedicated suite to a cage or cabinet.

        The first data center in our portfolio was purchased in 2000 by certain real estate funds ("the Funds") affiliated with The Carlyle Group, our Predecessor, and since then we have continued to acquire, develop and operate these types of facilities. Our properties are self-managed, including with respect to construction project management in connection with our development initiatives. As of December 31, 2013, our property portfolio included 16 operating data center facilities, multiple development projects and space and land held for development, which collectively comprise the potential for over 2.7 million net rentable square feet ("NRSF"), of which over 1.4 million NRSF is existing data center space.

2013 and Recent Developments

        On January 3, 2013, we amended and restated our revolving credit facility, which among other things, extended the maturity date from December 2014 to January 2018 (including a one-year extension option), and increased our borrowing capacity under the credit facility from $225.0 million to $355.0 million. The new credit facility is unsecured, compared to the prior facility which was secured by five properties. On June 28, 2013, we partially exercised the accordion feature under our revolving credit facility to increase the aggregate commitments by $50.0 million. As a result of the accordion exercise, the borrowing capacity increased from $355.0 million to $405.0 million, while all other terms remain unchanged.

4


Table of Contents

        On February 7, 2013, we acquired land and a vacant building, which we refer to as NY2, on 10 acres of land in Secaucus, New Jersey, and commenced development of our second data center property in the New York market. On December 2, 2013, we completed development of our first available computer room at NY2, comprised of 18,103 NRSF of which 11,500 NRSF was leased as of December 31, 2013. The development and acquisition was financed with borrowings under our revolving credit facility.

        On November 7, 2013, we completed development of SV5, a 101,721 NRSF fully leased powered shell data center located at our Santa Clara campus. The development was financed with borrowings under our revolving credit facility.

        At December 31, 2013, we had 118,300 NRSF under construction at NY2, LA2, and VA2 with completion expected in 2014.

        As part of the strategic sales and marketing realignment, CoreSite has appointed Steven Smith as Senior Vice President of Sales, effective January 27, 2014. In connection with this realignment, Jarrett Appleby, our former Chief Operating Officer, departed effective January 24, 2014. The realignment is designed to create a more efficient and effective go-to-market platform, as well as streamline the operating structure.

        On January 31, 2014, our Operating Partnership and certain subsidiaries entered into a $100 million senior unsecured term loan. The senior unsecured term loan has a five-year term and contains an accordion feature, which allows our Operating Partnership to increase the total commitments by $100 million, to $200 million, under specified circumstances. The senior unsecured term loan ranks pari passu with our revolving credit facility and contains the same financial covenants and other customary restrictive covenants as our revolving credit facility. The borrowings bear interest at a rate per annum equal to LIBOR plus 175 basis points to 265 basis points, depending on our Operating Partnership's leverage ratio. Our Operating Partnership used the proceeds from the senior unsecured term loan to repay the SV1 mortgage loan in its entirety and pay down a portion of its outstanding revolving credit balance.

        On February 3, 2014, we entered into a $100 million interest rate swap agreement to protect against adverse fluctuations in interest rates by reducing our exposure to variability in cash flow relating to interest payments on $100 million of one month LIBOR variable rate debt, which includes the senior unsecured term loan or the revolving credit facility. The interest rate swap has a five-year term and at CoreSite's current leverage ratio, effectively fixes the senior unsecured term loan interest rate at 3.23%.

Our Competitive Strengths

        We believe the following key competitive strengths position us to efficiently scale our business, capitalize on the demand for data center space and interconnection services, and thereby grow our cash flow.

        High Quality, Secure and Reliable Portfolio.    We help businesses protect mission-critical data, performance sensitive applications and IT infrastructure by delivering secure and reliable data center solutions with six 9s of uptime (99.9999%) in each of 2011, 2012 and 2013. Our data centers feature advanced efficient power and cooling infrastructure to support our customers IT infrastructure with additional power capacity to support continued growth. We believe our approximately 350 professionals deliver best-in-class service by placing customer needs first in supporting the planning, implementation and operating requirements of customers. We provide twenty-four-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week security guard monitoring with customizable security features. We have received non-modified SSAE16 SOCI Type 2 reports, prepared by an independent accounting firm, for all of operating our data center properties during the twelve months ended December 31, 2013.

5


Table of Contents

        Significant Network Density.    Many of our data centers are points of dense network interconnection that provide our customers with networking opportunities that help us retain existing customers and attract new ones. We believe that the diverse network connectivity options at these data centers provide us with a competitive advantage because network-dense facilities offering high levels of connectivity typically take many years to establish. Many providers in our facilities can leverage our sites as revenue opportunities by offering their services directly to other customers within our data centers, while enterprises, can reduce their total cost of operations by directly connecting to service providers in the same data center in a cost effective manner. We offer direct access to over 275 carriers and ISPs, over 180 leading cloud and IT service providers and inter-site connectivity. Our offerings include CoreSite's Open Cloud Exchange, Open Internet Exchange Hub and Any2 Internet Exchange. We offer cloud-enabled, network-rich data center campuses with over 15,000 interconnections across our portfolio.

        Expansion Capability.    By leasing readily available data center space and expanding our operating data center space, we anticipate that we will be able to meet the demand from our existing and prospective customers. At December 31, 2013, our data center facilities, including pre-stabilized NRSF, have approximately 308,000 NRSF of space readily available for lease. We have the ability to expand our data center square footage by approximately 900,000 NRSF, or 66%, through the development of 118,300 NRSF space under construction as of December 31, 2013, and approximately 800,000 NRSF at multiple facilities that is available for future development based on market supply and demand.

        Facilities in Key Markets.    Our portfolio is concentrated in some of the largest and most important U.S. metropolitan markets and we expect to continue benefitting from this proximity as customers seek new, high-quality data center space and interconnections within our markets, which are many of the key North American network, financial, cloud and commercial hubs. Our data centers are located in the New York, Northern Virginia (including Washington DC) and San Francisco Bay areas, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, Denver and Miami markets. These locations offer access to the power required to effectively run the facilities. Many of our facilities are also situated in close proximity to a concentration of key businesses and corporations, driving demand for our data center space and interconnection services.

        Flexibility and Scalability.    We lease space to enterprises across multiple sub-verticals like financial, healthcare, educational institutions, government agencies, manufacturing, and professional services. We believe our ability to be both flexible and scalable is a key differentiator. We offer many space, power, and interconnection options that allow customers to select products and services that meet their needs. We believe that many of our customers have chosen us because we offer space and power flexibility and numerous interconnection services to accommodate their growth. We believe we have a compelling combination of presence in most of the top data center hubs with the ability to meet customers' growing capacity requirements within those markets. Also, we offer diverse connectivity options throughout all of the data center campuses in our portfolio, and a healthy and growing community of network and mobility, cloud and IT service providers selling value added services.

        Diversified Customer Base.    We have a diverse, global customer base, which we believe is a reflection of our strong reputation and proven track record, as well as our customers' trust in our ability to house their mission-critical applications and vital communications technology. Our diverse customer base spans many industries across eight North America markets. In addition to geographic markets, we group our customers into the following five verticals:

6


Table of Contents

        Experienced Management Team.    Our management team has significant experience in the real estate and communications industry, specifically the colocation and data center markets. Notably, our Chief Executive Officer has over 25 years of experience in the acquisition, financing and operation of commercial real estate, which includes over 14 years in the data center industry and nine years at publicly traded REITs. Additionally, our Chief Financial Officer has approximately 26 years of financial experience, including five years with a publicly traded REIT where he served as Managing Director and Chief Accounting Officer and 18 years in public accounting with significant history as a partner with KPMG and Arthur Andersen, where he served as the Partner in charge of the real estate and financial services practices in Denver, Colorado.

        Balance Sheet Positioned to Fund Continued Growth.    As of December 31, 2013, we had approximately $347.5 million of outstanding long-term debt and preferred stock equal to approximately 29.6% of the undepreciated book value of our total assets and we had $5.3 million of cash available on our balance sheet. As of December 31, 2013, we have the ability to borrow an additional $222.4 million, subject to satisfying certain financial covenants which we currently meet. Subsequent to December 31, 2013, we entered into a $100 million senior unsecured term loan and used the proceeds to pay off the SV1 mortgage loan in its entirety and a portion of the outstanding revolving credit facility. Including this subsequent partial repayment of the revolving credit facility, we have the ability to borrow approximately $264 million on the revolving credit facility. In addition, the revolving credit facility and the unsecured term loan each contain accordion features which allow us to increase commitments by an aggregate amount of $195 million, under specified circumstances. We believe this available capital will be sufficient to fund our general corporate needs, including the completion of 118,300 NRSF of data center space under construction as of December 31, 2013.

Business and Growth Strategies

        Our business objective is to continue growing our position as a provider of strategically located data center space in North America. Key components of our strategy include the following:

        Increase Cash Flow of In-Place Data Center Space.    We actively manage and lease our properties to increase cash flow by:

7


Table of Contents

        Capitalize on Embedded Expansion Opportunities.    Including the space currently under construction at December 31, 2013, vacant space and land targeted for future development, we own land and buildings sufficient to develop approximately 900,000 square feet of data center space. Our development opportunities include ground-up construction on vacant parcels of land that we currently own and leveraging existing in-place infrastructure and entitlements in currently operating properties or campuses. In many cases, we are able to strategically deploy capital by developing space in incremental phases to meet customer demand.

        As of December 31, 2013, the largest development projects included 255,059 NRSF at NY2, of which 18,103 NRSF was delivered on December 2, 2013, 198,000 NRSF at VA2 and the Santa Clara Campus, a 15.75-acre property consisting of:

        The following table summarizes the development opportunities throughout our portfolio, each as of December 31, 2013:

 
  Development Opportunities (in NRSF)  
Facilities
  Under
Construction(1)
  Held for
Development(2)
  Total  

Los Angeles

                   

One Wilshire Campus

                   

LA2

    33,711     203,191     236,902  

San Francisco Bay

                   

Santa Clara Campus(3)

        173,240     173,240  

Northern Virginia

                   

VA2

    50,000     148,000     198,000  

Boston

                   

BO1

        87,650     87,650  

New York

                   

NY2

    34,589     202,367     236,956  

Miami

                   

MI1

        13,154     13,154  
               

Total Facilities

    118,300     827,602     945,902  
               
               

(1)
Reflects NRSF at a facility for which the initiation of substantial development activities to prepare the property for its intended use has commenced prior to December 31, 2013.

8


Table of Contents

(2)
Reflects NRSF held for development at a facility which will require substantial development activities to prepare the property for its intended use. NRSF held for development is management's estimate based on engineering drawings and required support space and is subject to change based on final demising of the space.

(3)
We may develop up to 360,000 NRSF at this campus. This includes entitlement of approximately 173,000 NRSF, included in the table above. Incremental to the 173,000 NRSF, we have approximately 71,000 NRSF of office and light industrial space at this campus which we may develop into data center space and we may develop an additional 116,000 NRSF of data center space at this campus upon our receipt of the necessary entitlement.

        Selectively Pursue Acquisition and Development Opportunities in New and Existing Markets.    We opportunistically evaluate opportunities to acquire or develop data center space with abundant power and/or dense points of interconnection in key markets that will expand our customer base and broaden our geographic footprint. Such acquisitions may entail subsequent development, which requires significant capital expenditures. We also will continue to implement the "hub-and-spoke strategy" that we have deployed in our four largest markets, namely the Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco Bay and Northern Virginia areas. In these markets, we have extended our data center footprint by connecting our newer facilities, the spokes, to our established data centers, our hubs, which allows our customers leasing space at the spokes to leverage the significant interconnection capabilities of our hubs. In order to deploy our "hub-and-spoke strategy," we typically rely on third-party providers of network connectivity to establish highly reliable network connectivity within and between certain of our data centers.

        Leverage Existing Customer Relationships and Reach New Customers.    Our strong customer and industry relationships, combined with our national footprint and sales force, afford us insight into the size, timing and location of customers' planned growth. We historically have been successful in leveraging this market visibility to expand our footprint and customer base in existing and new markets. We intend to continue to strengthen and expand our relationships with existing customers and to further grow and diversify our customer base by targeting growing customers and segments, such as domestic and international telecommunications carriers, content and media entertainment providers, cloud providers and enterprise customers, including financial, health care, educational institutions and government agencies.

9


Table of Contents

Our Portfolio

        The following table provides an overview of our properties, each as of December 31, 2013:

 
   
  Stabilized Operating NRSF    
   
   
 
 
   
  Pre-Stabilized
NRSF(5)
  Development
NRSF(6)
   
 
 
   
  Data Center(1)   Office and Light-Industrial(2)   Total    
 
Market/Facilities
  Annualized
Rent ($000)(3)
  Total   Percent
Occupied(4)
  Total   Percent
Occupied(4)
  Total(6)   Percent
Occupied(4)
  Total   Total   Total
Portfolio
NRSF
 

Los Angeles

                                                             

One Wilshire Campus

                                                             

LA1*

  $ 24,175     150,278     75.2 %   7,500     41.0 %   157,778     73.6 %           157,778  

LA2

    14,650     159,617     85.4     6,055     55.6     165,672     84.3     31,585     236,902     434,159  
                                           

Los Angeles Total

    38,825     309,895     80.4     13,555     47.5     323,450     79.1     31,585     236,902     591,937  

San Francisco Bay

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

SV1

    11,465     84,045     85.9     206,255     80.2     290,300     81.9             290,300  

SV2

    6,335     76,676     68.4             76,676     68.4             76,676  

Santa Clara Campus

    22,383     220,676     91.4     71,308     91.5     291,984     91.4     31,497     173,240     496,721  
                                           

San Francisco Bay Total

    40,183     381,397     85.5     277,563     83.1     658,960     84.5     31,497     173,240     863,697  

Northern Virginia

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

VA1

    21,791     201,719     75.9     61,050     79.4     262,769     76.7             262,769  

VA2

                                    198,000     198,000  

DC1*

    2,698     22,137     83.5             22,137     83.5             22,137  
                                           

Northern Virginia Total

    24,489     223,856     76.7     61,050     79.4     284,906     77.3         198,000     482,906  

Boston

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

BO1

    12,666     166,026     93.4     19,495     58.7     185,521     89.7         87,650     273,171  

Chicago

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

CH1

    11,355     158,167     81.2     4,946     62.3     163,113     80.6     20,240         183,353  

New York

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

NY1*

    4,811     48,404     68.0     209     100.0     48,613     68.2             48,613  

NY2

                                18,103     236,956     255,059  
                                           

New York Total

    4,811     48,404     68.0     209     100.0     48,613     68.2     18,103     236,956     303,672  

Miami

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

MI1

    1,698     30,176     44.3     1,934     38.6     32,110     44.0         13,154     45,264  

Denver

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

DE1*

    660     4,144     98.7             4,144     98.7             4,144  

DE2*

    144     5,140     66.3             5,140     66.3             5,140  
                                           

Denver Total

    804     9,284     80.7             9,284     80.7             9,284  
                                           

Total Facilities

  $ 134,831     1,327,205     81.7 %   378,752     79.5 %   1,705,957     81.2 %   101,425     945,902     2,753,284  
                                           
                                           

*
Indicates properties in which we hold a leasehold interest.

(1)
Represents the NRSF at each operating facility that is currently occupied or readily available for lease as data center space. Both occupied and available data center NRSF includes a factor to account for a customer's proportionate share of the required data center support space (such as the mechanical, telecommunications and utility rooms) and building common areas, which may be updated on a periodic basis to reflect the most current build-out of our properties.


(2)
Represents the NRSF at each operating facility that is currently occupied or readily available for lease as space other than data center space, which is typically space offered for office or light industrial uses.


(3)
Represents the monthly contractual rent on stabilized operating NRSF under existing commenced customer leases as of December 31, 2013, multiplied by 12. This amount reflects total annualized base rent before any one-time or non-recurring rent abatements and excludes power revenue, interconnection revenue and operating expense reimbursement. On a gross basis, our annualized rent was approximately $138.1 million as of December 31, 2013, which reflects the addition of $3.3 million in operating expense reimbursements to contractual net rent under modified gross and triple-net leases.


(4)
Includes customer leases that have commenced and are occupied as of December 31, 2013. The percent occupied is determined based on leased square feet as a proportion of total operating NRSF. The percent occupied for data center space, office and light industrial space, and space in total would have been 83.3%, 79.5%, and 82.5%, respectively, if all leases signed in current and prior periods had commenced.


(5)
Represents pre-stabilized NRSF of projects/facilities which recently have been developed and are in the initial lease-up phase. Effective January 1, 2013, new pre-stabilized projects/facilities are excluded from stabilized operating NRSF. Pre-stabilized projects/facilities become stabilized operating properties at the earlier of achievement of 85% occupancy or 24 months after development completion. Annualized rent and NRSF percent occupied for pre-stabilized NRSF is $2.7 million and 20.7%, respectively, as of December 31, 2013.


(6)
Represents vacant space and entitled land in our portfolio that requires significant capital investment in order to develop into data center facilities as of December 31, 2013. Includes NRSF under construction for which substantial activities are ongoing to prepare the property for its intended use following development.

10


Table of Contents

        The following table shows the December 31, 2013, operating statistics for space that was leased and available to be leased as of December 31, 2011, at each of our properties, and excludes space for which development was completed and became available to be leased after December 31, 2011 (the December 31, 2011, same store pool). For comparison purposes, the operating activity totals as of December 31, 2012, and 2011, for this space are provided at the bottom of this table.

 
   
  Same Store Property Portfolio (in NRSF)  
 
   
  Data Center   Office and Light-
Industrial
  Total  
Market/Facilities
  Annualized
Rent ($000)(1)
  Total   Percent
Occupied(2)
  Total   Percent
Occupied(2)
  Total   Percent
Occupied(2)
 

Los Angeles

                                           

One Wilshire Campus

                                           

LA1*

  $ 24,175     150,278     75.2 %   7,500     41.0 %   157,778     73.6 %

LA2

    14,395     156,366     85.1     5,147     65.4     161,513     84.5  
                               

Los Angeles Total

    38,570     306,644     80.2     12,647     50.9     319,291     79.1  

San Francisco Bay

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

SV1

    11,465     84,045     85.9     206,255     80.2     290,300     81.9  

SV2

    6,335     76,676     68.4             76,676     68.4  

Santa Clara Campus

    12,695     68,116     88.2     70,760     91.6     138,876     90.0  
                               

San Francisco Bay Total

    30,495     228,837     80.7     277,015     83.1     505,852     82.0  

Northern Virginia

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

VA1

    19,004     137,670     93.2     61,050     79.4     198,720     89.0  

DC1*

    2,698     22,137     83.5             22,137     83.5  
                               

Northern Virginia Total

    21,702     159,807     91.9     61,050     79.4     220,857     88.4  

Boston

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

BO1

    10,797     148,795     92.6     13,063     38.4     161,858     88.2  

Chicago

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

CH1

    10,476     128,906     90.3     4,946     62.3     133,852     89.2  

New York

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

NY1*

    4,799     48,404     68.0             48,404     68.0  

Miami

   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
   
 
 

MI1

    1,698     30,176     44.3     1,934     38.6     32,110     44.0  
                               

Total Facilities at December 31, 2013(3)

  $ 118,537     1,051,569     83.5 %   370,655     79.3 %   1,422,224     82.4 %
                               
                               

Total Facilities at December 31, 2012

  $ 114,206           84.2 %         79.1 %         82.8 %
                                     
                                     

Total Facilities at December 31, 2011

  $ 103,502           83.5 %         83.5 %         83.5 %
                                     
                                     

*
Indicates properties in which we hold a leasehold interest.

(1)
Represents the monthly contractual rent under existing commenced customer leases as of each respective period, multiplied by 12. This amount reflects total annualized base rent before any one-time or non-recurring rent abatements and excludes power revenue, interconnection revenue and operating expense reimbursement.

(2)
Includes customer leases that have commenced and are occupied as of each respective period. The percent occupied is determined based on leased square feet as a proportion of total operating NRSF.

(3)
The percent occupied for data center space, office and light industrial space, and space in total would have been 84.9%, 79.3%, and 83.5%, respectively, if all leases signed in current and prior periods had commenced.

Capital Expenditures

        During the year ended December 31, 2013, we incurred approximately $232.7 million of capital expenditures, of which approximately $195.5 million related to new data center construction, development projects adding capacity to existing data center and other revenue generating investments.

        At our Santa Clara campus, we completed development of SV5, a built-to-suit project, which increased operating data center space by 101,721 NRSF and was 100% leased upon completion. We incurred approximately $20.0 million of capital expenditures on SV5 during the year ended December 31, 2013. Also, at the Santa Clara campus, we placed into service two computer rooms at SV4, which increased our pre-stabilized data center space by 31,497 NRSF during the year ended December 31, 2013, of which the capital expenditures were primarily incurred during the year ended December 31, 2012.

11


Table of Contents

        We incurred approximately $94.0 million of capital expenditures on NY2 during the year ended December 31, 2013, which included the initial acquisition of the land and vacant building, one computer room placed into service and two computer rooms under development as of December 31, 2013. We completed development of one computer room at NY2, which increased pre-stabilized data center space by 18,103 NRSF.

        We also incurred $81.5 million of capital expenditures to add capacity in new computer rooms at BO1, CH1, LA2, VA2 and other properties during the year ended December 31, 2013.

        The remaining $37.2 million of capital expenditures during the year ended December 31, 2013, includes non-recurring investments, such as upgrades to existing data center or office space, internal IT system development and system-wide security upgrades, tenant improvements and recurring capital expenditures.

Customer Diversification

        The following table sets forth information regarding the ten largest customers in our portfolio based on annualized rent as of December 31, 2013:

 
 
Industry
  CoreSite Vertical   Number
of
Locations
  Total
Occupied
NRSF(1)
  Percentage
of Total
Operating
NRSF(2)
  Annualized
Rent
($000)(3)
  Percentage
of
Annualized
Rent(4)
  Weighted
Average
Remaining
Lease
Term in
Months(5)
 

1

 

Technology

  Digital Content     3     52,374     3.1 % $ 10,082     7.5 %   34  

2

 

Technology

  Cloud     5     126,734     7.4     6,880     5.1     75  

3

 

Technology

  Systems Integration & Managed Service Provider     3     53,014     3.1     6,562     4.9     44  

4

 

Technology

  Digital Content     9     52,270     3.1     5,714     4.2     13  

5

 

Government*

  Enterprise     1     141,774     8.3     4,079     3.0     95  

6

 

Technology

  Cloud     1     27,036     1.6     3,969     2.9     53  

7

 

Financial

  Enterprise     2     11,855     0.7     3,028     2.2     14  

8

 

Technology

  Systems Integration & Managed Service Provider     1     6,034     0.4     2,569     1.9     13  

9

 

Government

  Enterprise     2     16,764     1.0     2,324     1.7     9  

10

 

Telecommunications

  Network     3     18,562     1.1     2,049     1.5     83  
                                     

 

Total/Weighted Average

              506,417     29.8 % $ 47,256     34.9 %   44  
                                     
                                     

*
Denotes customer using space for general office purposes.

(1)
Total occupied NRSF is determined based on contractually leased square feet for leases that have commenced on or before December 31, 2013. We calculate occupancy based on factors in addition to contractually leased square feet, including required data center support space (such as the mechanical, telecommunications and utility rooms) and building common areas.

(2)
Represents the customer's total occupied square feet divided by the total operating NRSF in the portfolio which, as of December 31, 2013, consisted of 1,705,957 NRSF.

(3)
Represents the monthly contractual rent under existing commenced customer leases as of December 31, 2013, multiplied by 12. This amount reflects total annualized base rent before any one-time or non-recurring rent abatements and excludes power revenue, interconnection revenue and operating expense reimbursement.

(4)
Represents the customer's total annualized rent divided by the total annualized rent in the portfolio as of December 31, 2013, which was approximately $134.8 million.

(5)
Weighted average based on percentage of total annualized rent expiring calculated as of December 31, 2013.

12


Table of Contents

Lease Distribution

        The following table sets forth information relating to the distribution of leases in the properties in our portfolio, based on NRSF (excluding space held for development and pre-stabilized) under lease as of December 31, 2013:

Square Feet Under Lease(1)
  Number
of
Leases(2)
  Percentage
of All
Leases
  Total
Operating
NRSF of
Leases(3)
  Percentage
of Total
Operating
NRSF
  Annualized
Rent
($000)(4)
  Percentage
of
Annualized
Rent
 

Available colocation(5)

        %   242,761     14.2 % $     %

Available office and light-industrial

            77,656     4.6          

Colocation NRSF:

                                     

5,000 or less

    1,273     91.4     441,717     25.9     71,778     53.2  

5,001 - 10,000

    17     1.2     114,210     6.7     13,488     10.0  

10,001 - 25,000

    10     0.8     158,232     9.3     25,031     18.6  

Greater than 25,000

    2     0.1     60,807     3.6     7,161     5.3  

Powered shell

    16     1.1     309,478     18.1     10,375     7.7  

Office and light industrial

    75     5.4     301,096     17.6     6,998     5.2  
                           

Portfolio Total

    1,393     100.0 %   1,705,957     100.0 % $ 134,831     100.0 %
                           
                           

(1)
Represents all leases in our portfolio, including data center and office and light industrial leases.

(2)
Includes leases that upon expiration will automatically be renewed, primarily on a month-to-month basis. Number of leases represents each agreement with a customer; a lease agreement could include multiple spaces and a customer could have multiple leases.

(3)
Represents the square feet at a building under lease as specified in the lease agreements plus management's estimate of space available for lease to third parties based on engineers' drawings and other factors, including required data center support space (such as mechanical, telecommunications and utility rooms) and building common areas.

(4)
Represents the monthly contractual rent under existing commenced customer leases as of December 31, 2013, multiplied by 12. This amount reflects total annualized base rent before any one-time or non-recurring rent abatements and it excludes power revenue, interconnection revenue and operating expense reimbursement.

(5)
Excludes NRSF held for development or under construction.

13


Table of Contents

Lease Expirations

        The following table sets forth a summary schedule of the expirations for leases in place as of December 31, 2013, plus available space for each of the five full calendar years beginning January 1, 2014, at the properties in our portfolio. The information set forth in the table assumes that customers exercise no renewal options or early termination rights.

Year of Lease Expiration
  Number of
Leases
Expiring(1)
  Total
Operating
NRSF of
Expiring
Leases
  Percentage
of Total
Operating
NRSF
  Annualized
Rent
($000)(2)
  Percentage
of
Annualized
Rent
  Annualized
Rent Per
Leased
NRSF
  Annualized
Rent at
Expiration
($000)(3)
  Annualized
Rent Per
Leased
NRSF at
Expiration(4)
 

Available as of December 31, 2013(5)

        320,417     18.8 % $     % $   $   $  

2014

    600     209,968     12.3     31,087     23.1     148.06     31,911     151.98  

2015

    265     166,433     9.8     28,440     21.1     170.88     29,887     179.57  

2016

    246     149,934     8.8     21,417     15.9     142.84     25,156     167.78  

2017

    112     125,627     7.4     19,619     14.6     156.17     25,665     204.30  

2018

    64     141,983     8.3     14,358     10.6     101.12     17,976     126.61  

2019-Thereafter

    31     290,499     17.0     12,912     9.6     44.45     20,860     71.81  

Office and light industrial(6)

    75     301,096     17.6     6,998     5.1     23.24     7,004     23.26  
                                   

Portfolio Total / Weighted Average

    1,393     1,705,957     100.0 % $ 134,831     100.0 % $ 97.31   $ 158,459   $ 114.37  
                                   
                                   

(1)
Includes leases that upon expiration will automatically be renewed, primarily on a month-to-month basis. Number of leases represents each agreement with a customer; a lease agreement could include multiple spaces and a customer could have multiple leases.

(2)
Represents the monthly contractual rent under existing commenced customer leases as of December 31, 2013, multiplied by 12. This amount reflects total annualized base rent before any one-time or non-recurring rent abatements and excludes power revenue, interconnection revenue and operating expense reimbursement.

(3)
Represents the final monthly contractual rent under existing customer leases as of December 31, 2013, multiplied by 12. This amount reflects total annualized base rent before any one-time or non-recurring rent abatements and excludes operating expense reimbursement, power revenue and interconnection revenue.

(4)
Annualized rent at expiration as defined above, divided by the square footage of leases expiring in the given year. This metric reflects the rent growth inherent in the existing base of lease agreements.

(5)
Excludes NRSF held for development or under construction.

(6)
Of the occupied office and light industrial leases, 17,116 NRSF, 4,638 NRSF, 90,981 NRSF, 33,477 NRSF, 4,207 NRSF and 150,677 NRSF are scheduled to expire in 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 and thereafter, respectively, which accounts for (in thousands) $427, $86, $1,666, $494, $108 and $4,217 of annualized rent scheduled to expire during each respective period.

Competition

        We compete with numerous developers, owners and operators of technology-related real estate and data centers, many of which own properties similar to ours in the same markets in which our properties are located, including AT&T Inc., Centurylink Inc., Savvis, Inc., a Centurylink company, CyrusOne, Inc., Digital Realty Trust, Inc., DuPont Fabros Technology, Inc., Equinix, Inc., Internap Network Services Corporation, Quality Technology Services, RagingWire Data Center, SABEY Corporation, Telx Group Inc., Verizon / Terremark Worldwide, Inc., ViaWest Inc., and Zayo Colocation Inc. In addition, we may face competition from new entrants into the data center market. Some of our competitors and potential competitors may have significant advantages over us, including greater name recognition, longer operating histories, pre-existing relationships with current or potential customers, significantly greater financial, marketing and other resources, and access to less expensive power, all of which could allow them to respond more quickly to new or changing opportunities. If our competitors offer space, power and/or interconnection services at rates below current market rates, or below the rates we currently charge our customers, we may lose potential customers and we may be pressured to reduce our rental rates below those we currently charge in order to retain customers when our customers' leases expire.

14


Table of Contents

        As a developer of data center space and provider of interconnection services, we also compete for the services of key third-party providers of services, including engineers and contractors with expertise in the development of data centers. The competition for the services of specialized contractors and other third-party providers required for the development of data centers is intense, increasing the cost of engaging such providers and the risk of delays in completing our development projects.

        In addition, we face competition from real estate developers in our sector and in other industries for the acquisition of additional properties suitable for the development of data centers. Such competition may reduce the number of properties available for acquisition, increase the price of these properties and reduce the demand for data center space in the markets we seek to serve.

Regulation

General

        Data centers in our markets are subject to various laws, ordinances and regulations, including regulations relating to common areas. We believe that each of our properties has the necessary permits and approvals to operate our business.

Americans with Disabilities Act

        Our properties must comply with Title III of the American with Disabilities Act, or the ADA, to the extent that such properties are places of "public accommodation" or "commercial facilities" as defined by the ADA. The ADA requires properties that are places of "public accommodation" to, among other things, remove existing barriers to access by persons with disabilities where such removal is readily achievable. The ADA also requires places of "public accommodation" as well as "commercial facilities" undergoing new construction or alterations to conform to the ADA Accessibility Guidelines, which provide design standards that permit accessibility by individuals with disabilities. Further, if entities on our properties offer certain examinations or courses (i.e., those related to applications, licensing, certification, or credentialing for secondary or postsecondary education, professional, or trade purposes), they must be offered in an accessible place and manner or with alternative accessible arrangements. We believe that our properties are in substantial compliance with the ADA and that we will not be required to make substantial capital expenditures to those properties to address the requirements of the ADA. However, noncompliance with the ADA could result in imposition of monetary damages and civil penalties in lawsuits brought by the Attorney General or an award of attorneys' fees to private litigants. The obligation to make readily achievable accommodations as required by the ADA is an ongoing one, and we will continue to assess our properties and make alterations as appropriate.

Environmental Matters

        Under various federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to the protection of the environment, a current or previous owner or operator of real estate may be liable for contamination resulting from the presence or discharge of hazardous or toxic substances at that property, and may be required to investigate and clean up such contamination at that property or emanating from that property. Such laws and regulations often impose liability without regard to whether the owner or operator knew of, or was responsible for, the presence of the contaminants, and a party may be liable for all of the cleanup costs, even when more than one person was responsible for the contamination. Previous owners used some of our properties for industrial and retail purposes, so those properties may contain some level of environmental contamination. The presence of contamination or the failure to remediate contamination at our properties may expose us to third-party liability or materially adversely affect our ability to sell, lease or develop the real estate or to borrow using the real estate as collateral. In addition, we could incur costs to comply with such laws and regulations, the violation of which could lead to substantial fines and penalties.

15


Table of Contents

        Environmental laws and regulations also require that asbestos-containing building materials be properly managed and maintained and may impose fines and penalties on building owners or operators for failure to comply with these requirements. Further, third parties could potentially seek recovery from owners or operators for personal injury associated with exposure to asbestos-containing building materials.

        In addition, certain of our customers, particularly those that lease light-industrial space from us, routinely handle hazardous substances and wastes as part of their operations at our properties. Environmental laws and regulations subject our customers, and potentially us, to liability resulting from these activities or from previous industrial or other uses of those properties. Environmental liabilities could also affect a customer's ability to make rental payments to us. We require our customers to comply with these environmental laws and regulations and to indemnify us for any related liabilities.

        Independent environmental consultants have conducted Phase I or similar environmental site assessments on all owned properties in our portfolio. Each of the site assessments has been either completed or updated since 2005. Site assessments are intended to collect and evaluate information regarding the environmental condition of the surveyed property and surrounding properties. These assessments do not generally include soil sampling, subsurface investigations or asbestos sampling. Although prior commercial or industrial operations at some of our properties may have released hazardous materials and some of our properties contain or may contain asbestos-containing building materials, none of the recent site assessments revealed any past or present environmental liability that we believe would have a material adverse effect on our business, assets or results of operations. However, the assessments may have failed to reveal all environmental conditions, liabilities or compliance concerns. Material environmental conditions, liabilities or compliance concerns may have arisen after the reviews were completed or may arise in the future; and future laws, ordinances or regulations may impose material additional environmental liability. See "Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business and Operations—Environmental problems are possible and can be costly."

Insurance

        We carry comprehensive liability, fire, extended coverage, earthquake, business interruption, rental loss, and umbrella liability insurance covering all of the properties in our portfolio augmented by excess liability coverage in an amount that we believe to be appropriate. We select policy specifications and insured limits which we believe to be appropriate given the relative risk of loss, the cost of the coverage and industry practice and, in the opinion of our management, the properties in our portfolio are currently adequately insured. We do not carry insurance for generally uninsured losses such as loss from riots, war or acts of God. In addition, we carry earthquake insurance on our properties in an amount and with deductibles which we believe are commercially reasonable. Certain of the properties in our portfolio are located in areas believed to be seismically active. Potential losses to our properties may not be covered by insurance or may exceed our policy coverage limits. See "Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Business and Operations—Potential losses to our properties may not be covered by insurance or may exceed our policy coverage limits" in Item 1A. of this Annual Report.

Employees

        As of December 31, 2013, we had 363 full-time and part-time employees, of which 187 employees are salaried with the remainder paid on an hourly basis. None of our employees is a member of a labor union and we believe that our relations with employees are good.

Offices

        Our corporate offices are located at 1001 17th Street, Suite 500, Denver, CO 80202.

16


Table of Contents

How to Obtain Our SEC Filings

        All reports we file with the SEC are available free of charge via EDGAR through the SEC website at www.sec.gov. In addition, the public may read and copy materials we file with the SEC at the SEC's public reference room located at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. We also provide copies of our Forms 8-K, 10-K, 10-Q, Proxy Statement, Annual Report and amendments to those documents at no charge to investors upon request and make electronic copies of such reports available through our website at www.coresite.com as soon as reasonably practicable after filing such material with the SEC. The information found on, or otherwise accessible through, our website is not incorporated by reference into, nor does it form a part of, this Annual Report on Form 10-K, or any other document that we file with the SEC.

Financial Information

        We manage our business as one reportable segment consisting of investments in data centers located in the United States. For required financial information related to our operations and assets, please refer to our consolidated financial statements, including the notes thereto, included in Item 8. "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" in this Annual Report.

ITEM 1A.    RISK FACTORS

        Any of the following risks could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition. The risks and uncertainties described below are those that we currently believe may materially affect our company. Additional risks and uncertainties of which we are unaware or that we currently deem immaterial also may become important factors that affect our company.


Risks Related to Our Business and Operations

Global economic conditions could adversely affect our liquidity and financial condition.

        General economic conditions and the cost and availability of capital may be adversely affected in some or all of the markets in which we own properties and conduct our operations. Turbulence in the U.S., European and other international financial markets and economies may adversely affect our ability, and the ability of our tenants, to replace or renew maturing liabilities on a timely basis, access the capital markets to meet liquidity and capital expenditure requirements and may result in adverse effects on our, and our tenants', financial condition and results of operations.

        In addition, our access to funds under our revolving credit facility and other lines of credit we may enter into depend on the ability of the lenders that are parties to such facilities to meet their funding commitments to us. We cannot assure you that long-term disruptions in the global economy and the return of tighter credit conditions among, and potential failures or nationalizations of, third party financial institutions as a result of such disruptions will not have an adverse effect on our lenders. If our lenders are not able to meet their funding commitments to us, our business, results of operation, cash flows and financial condition could be adversely affected.

        If we do not have sufficient cash flow to continue operating our business and are unable to borrow additional funds, access our existing lines of credit or raise equity or debt capital, we may need to find alternative ways to increase our liquidity. Such alternatives may include, without limitation, curtailing development activity, disposing of one or more of our properties possibly on disadvantageous terms or entering into or renewing leases on less favorable terms than we otherwise would.

17


Table of Contents

Our portfolio of properties consists primarily of data centers geographically concentrated in certain markets and any adverse developments in local economic conditions or the demand for data center space in these markets may negatively impact our operating results.

        Our portfolio of properties consists primarily of data centers geographically concentrated in the San Francisco Bay areas, Los Angeles, Northern Virginia areas, Boston, Chicago, New York, Miami and Denver. These markets comprised 29.8%, 28.7%, 18.2%, 9.4%, 8.4%, 3.6%, 1.3%, and 0.6%, respectively, of our annualized rent as of December 31, 2013. As such, we are susceptible to local economic conditions and the supply of and demand for data center space in these markets. If there is a downturn in the economy or an oversupply of or decrease in demand for data centers in these markets, our business could be materially adversely affected to a greater extent than if we owned a real estate portfolio that was more diversified in terms of both geography and industry focus.

The market price of our stock may continue to be highly volatile, and the value of an investment in our common stock may decline.

        During the year ended December 31, 2013, the closing sale price of our common stock on the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") has ranged from $27.51 to $38.57 per share. The market price of the shares of our common stock has been and may continue to be highly volatile. General economic and market conditions, and market conditions for telecommunications and real estate stocks in general, may affect the market price of our common stock.

        Announcements by us or others, or speculations about our future plans, may also have a significant impact on the market price of our common stock. These may relate to:

        The stock market has from time to time experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations, which have particularly affected the market prices for emerging telecommunications and real estate companies, and which have often been unrelated to their operating performance. These broad market fluctuations may adversely affect the market price of our common stock. Furthermore, companies that have experienced volatility in the market price of their stock have been subject to securities class action litigation. We may be the target of this type of litigation in the future. Securities litigation against us could result in substantial costs and/or damages, and divert management's attention from other business concerns, which could seriously harm our business.

18


Table of Contents

We face significant competition and may be unable to lease vacant space, renew existing leases or release space as leases expire, which may have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

        We compete with numerous developers, owners and operators of technology-related real estate and data centers, many of which own properties similar to ours in the same markets. In addition, we may face competition from new entrants into the data center market. Some of our competitors have significant advantages over us, including greater name recognition, longer operating histories, lower operating costs, pre-existing relationships with current or potential customers, greater financial, marketing and other resources, access to better networks and access to less expensive power. These advantages could allow our competitors to respond more quickly or effectively to strategic opportunities or changes in our industries or markets. If our competitors offer data center space that our existing or potential customers perceive to be superior to ours based on numerous factors, including cost and availability of power, security considerations, location or network connectivity, or if they offer rental rates below our current market rates, we may lose existing or potential customers, incur costs to improve our properties or be forced to reduce our rental rates. This risk is compounded by the fact that a significant percentage of our customer leases expire every year. For example, as of December 31, 2013, data center leases representing 23.1%, 21.1% and 15.9% of our annualized rent will expire during 2014, 2015, and 2016, respectively. If the rental rates for our properties decrease, our existing customers do not renew their leases or we are unable to lease vacant data center space or re-lease data center space for which leases are scheduled to expire, our business and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

We are continuing to invest in our expansion efforts, but we may not have sufficient customer demand in the future to realize expected returns on these investments.

        As part of our growth strategy, we intend to commit substantial operational and financial resources to develop new data centers and expand existing ones. However, we typically do not require pre-leasing commitments from customers before we develop or expand a data center, and we may not have sufficient customer demand to lease the new data center space when completed. Once development of a data center is complete, we incur a certain amount of operating expenses even if there are no tenants occupying the space. A lack of customer demand for data center space or excess capacity in the data center market could impair our ability to achieve our expected rate of return on our investment, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, operating results and the market price of our common stock.

Declining real estate valuations and impairment charges could adversely affect our earnings and financial condition.

        We periodically review each of our properties for indicators that its carrying amount may not be recoverable. Examples of such indicators may include a significant decrease in the market prices of properties, a significant adverse change in the extent or manner in which the property is being used or expected to be used based on the underwriting at the time of acquisition, or a change in its physical condition, an accumulation of costs significantly in excess of the amount originally expected for the acquisition or development, or a history of operating or cash flow losses. When such impairment indictors exist, we review an estimate of the future cash flows (excluding interest charges) expected to result from the real estate investment's use and eventual disposition and compare to the carrying value of the property. We consider factors such as future operating income, trends and prospects, as well as the effects of leasing demand, competition and other factors. If our undiscounted net cash flow evaluation indicates that we are unable to recover the carrying value of a real estate investment, an impairment loss is recorded to the extent that the carrying value exceeds the estimated fair value of the property. Recording an impairment loss would result in an immediate negative adjustment to net income. The evaluation of anticipated cash flows is highly subjective and is based in part on assumptions regarding future occupancy, rental rates and capital requirements that could differ materially from actual results in future periods. A worsening real estate market may cause us to reevaluate the assumptions used in our impairment analysis. Impairment charges could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and the market price of our stock.

19


Table of Contents

Our properties depend upon the demand for technology-related real estate.

        Our portfolio of properties consists primarily of technology-related real estate and data center real estate in particular. A decrease in the demand for data center space, Internet gateway facilities or other technology-related real estate would have a greater adverse effect on our business and financial condition than if we owned a portfolio with a more diversified tenant base or less specialized use. Our substantial development activities make us particularly susceptible to general economic slowdowns, including recessions, as well as adverse developments in the corporate data center, Internet and data communications and broader technology industries. Any such slowdown or adverse development could lead to reduced corporate IT spending or reduced demand for data center space. Reduced demand could also result from business relocations, including to markets that we do not currently serve. Changes in industry practice or in technology, such as virtualization technology, more efficient or miniaturization of computing or networking devices, or devices that require higher power densities than today's devices, could also reduce demand for the physical data center space we provide or make the tenant improvements in our facilities obsolete or in need of significant upgrades to remain viable. The development of new technologies, the adoption of new industry standards or other factors could render many of our customers' current products and services obsolete or unmarketable and contribute to a downturn in their businesses, thereby increasing the likelihood that they default under their leases, become insolvent or file for bankruptcy. In addition, existing initiatives relating to the formation of internet exchange alternatives could have a negative effect on the demand for and pricing of the subset of our interconnection income relating to internet exchanges.

Our products and services have a long sales cycle that may harm our revenues and operating results.

        A customer's decision to license cabinet space in one of our data centers and to purchase additional services typically involves a significant commitment of resources. In addition, some customers will be reluctant to commit to locating in our data centers until they are confident that the data center has adequate carrier connections. As a result, we have a long sales cycle. Furthermore, we may expend significant time and resources in pursuing a particular sale or customer that does not result in revenue. We have also significantly expanded our sales force in the past year. It will take time for these new hires to become fully productive.

        An economic downturn may further impact this long sales cycle by making it extremely difficult for customers to accurately forecast and plan future business activities. This could cause customers to slow spending or delay decision-making on our products and services, which would delay and lengthen our sales cycle.

        Delays due to the length of our sales cycle may materially and adversely affect our revenues and operating results, which could harm our ability to meet our forecasts for a given quarter and cause volatility in our stock price.

Any failure of our physical infrastructure or services could lead to significant costs and disruptions that could reduce our revenues, harm our business reputation and have a material adverse effect on our financial results.

        Our business depends on providing customers with highly reliable service. We may fail to provide such service as a result of numerous factors, including:

20


Table of Contents

        Problems at one or more of our data centers, whether or not within our control, could result in service interruptions or equipment damage. We provide service level commitments to substantially all of our customers. As a result, service interruptions or equipment damage in our data centers could result in billing abatements to these customers. In addition, although we have given such abatements to our customers in the past, there can be no assurance that our customers will accept these abatements as compensation in the future. Service interruptions and equipment failures may also expose us to additional legal liability and damage our brand image and reputation. Significant or frequent service interruptions could cause our customers to terminate or not renew their leases. In addition, we may be unable to attract new customers if we have a reputation for significant or frequent service disruptions in our data centers.

Even if we have additional space available for lease at any one of our data centers, our ability to lease this space to existing or new customers could be constrained by our access to sufficient electrical power.

        Our properties have access to a finite amount of power, which limits the extent to which we can lease additional space for use at our data centers. As current and future customers increase their power footprint in our facilities over time, the remaining available power for future customers could limit our ability to increase occupancy rates or network density within our existing facilities.

        Furthermore, at certain of our data centers, our aggregate maximum contractual obligation to provide power and cooling to our customers may exceed the physical capacity at such data centers if customers were to quickly increase their demand for power and cooling. If we are not able to increase the available power and/or cooling or move the customer to another location within our data centers with sufficient power and cooling to meet such demand, we could lose the customer as well as be exposed to liability under our leases. Any such material loss of customers or material liability could adversely affect our results of operations.

Our properties are not suitable for use other than as data centers, which could make it difficult to reposition them if we are not able to lease available space and could materially adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

        Our data centers are designed solely to house and run computer servers and related equipment and, therefore, contain extensive electrical and mechanical systems and infrastructure. As a result, they are not suited for use by customers as anything other than as data centers and major renovations and expenditures would be required in order for us to re-lease vacant space for more traditional uses, or for us to sell a property to a buyer for use other than as a data center.

21


Table of Contents

To fund our growth strategy and refinance our indebtedness, we depend on external sources of capital, which may not be available to us on commercially reasonable terms or at all.

        In order to maintain our qualification as a REIT, we are required under the Internal Revenue Code (the "Code") to distribute at least 90% of our net taxable income annually, determined without regard to the dividends paid deduction and excluding any net capital gains. We will also be subject to income tax at regular corporate rates to the extent that we distribute less than 100% of our net taxable income, including any net capital gains. These distribution requirements may limit our ability to fund future capital needs, including any necessary acquisition financing, from operating cash flow. Consequently, we intend to rely on third-party sources for debt or equity financing to fund our growth strategy. In addition, we may need external sources of capital to refinance our indebtedness at maturity. We may not be able to obtain such financing or refinancing on favorable terms or at all. Our access to third-party sources of capital depends, in part, on:

        In addition, our ability to access additional capital may be limited by the terms of our existing indebtedness, which restricts our incurrence of additional debt. If we cannot obtain capital when needed, we may not be able to acquire or develop properties when strategic opportunities arise or refinance our debt at maturity, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

We may be vulnerable to security breaches and cyber-attacks which could disrupt our operations and have a material adverse effect on our financial performance and operating results.

        A party who is able to compromise the security measures on our networks or the security of our infrastructure could misappropriate our proprietary information and the personal information of our customers and cause interruptions or malfunctions in our or our customers' operations. We may be required to expend significant financial resources to protect against such threats or to alleviate problems caused by security breaches. As techniques used to breach security change frequently and are generally not recognized until launched against a target, we may not be able to implement security measures in a timely manner or, if and when implemented, these measures could be circumvented. Any breaches that may occur could expose us to increased risk of lawsuits, loss of existing or potential future customers, harm to our reputation and increases in our security costs, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial performance and operating results.

We have government customers, which subjects us to risks including early termination, audits, investigations, sanctions and penalties.

        We derive some revenues from contracts with the U.S. government, state and local governments and their respective agencies. Some of these customers may terminate all or part of their contracts at any time, without cause.

        There is increased pressure for governments and their agencies to reduce spending. Some of our federal government contracts are subject to the approval of appropriations being made by the U.S. Congress to fund the expenditures under these contracts. Similarly, some of our contracts at the state and local levels are subject to government funding authorizations.

22


Table of Contents

        Additionally, government contracts are generally subject to audits and investigations which could result in various civil and criminal penalties and administrative sanctions, including termination of contracts, refund of a portion of fees received, forfeiture of profits, suspension of payments, fines and suspensions or debarment from future government business.

Our success depends on key personnel whose continued service is not guaranteed and we may not be able to retain or attract knowledgeable, experienced and qualified personnel.

        We depend on the efforts of key personnel, particularly Thomas Ray, our President and Chief Executive Officer and Jeffrey Finnin, our Chief Financial Officer. Our reputation and relationships with existing and potential future customers, industry personnel and key lenders are the direct result of a significant investment of time and effort by our key personnel to build credibility in a highly specialized industry. Many of our senior executives have extensive experience and strong reputations in the real estate and technology industries, which aid us in capitalizing on strategic opportunities and negotiating with customers. While we believe that we will be able to find suitable replacements for key personnel who may depart from time to time, the loss of their services could diminish our business and investment opportunities and our customer, industry and lender relationships, which could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial performance.

        In addition, our success depends, to a significant degree, on being able to employ and retain personnel who have the expertise required to successfully acquire, develop, lease and operate high-quality data centers. Personnel with these skill sets are in limited supply so the demand and competition for such expertise is intense. We cannot assure you that we will be able to hire and retain a sufficient number of qualified employees at reasonable compensation levels to support our growth and maintain the high level of quality service our customers expect, and any failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our expenses may not decrease if our revenue decreases.

        Most of the expenses associated with our business, such as debt service payments, real estate, personal and ad valorem taxes, insurance, utilities, employee wages and benefits and corporate expenses are relatively inflexible and do not necessarily decrease in tandem with a reduction in revenue from our business. Our expenses will also be affected by inflationary increases and certain of our costs may exceed the rate of inflation in any given period. As a result, we may not be able to fully offset our costs by higher lease rates, which could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial performance.

We depend on third parties to provide network connectivity within and between certain of our data centers, and any delays or disruptions in this connectivity may adversely affect our operating results and cash flow.

        We depend upon carriers and other network providers to deliver network connectivity to customers within our data centers as well as the fiber network interconnection between our data centers. Our hub-and-spoke approach makes us dependent on these third parties to provide these services between our data centers. We cannot assure you that any network provider will elect to offer its services within new data centers that we develop or that once a network provider decides to provide connectivity to or between our data centers, it will continue to do so for any period of time. A significant interruption in or loss of these services could impair our ability to attract and retain customers and have a material adverse effect on our business.

        Enabling connectivity within and between our data centers requires construction and operation of a sophisticated redundant fiber network. The construction required to connect our data centers is complex and may involve factors outside of our control, including the availability of construction resources. If highly reliable connectivity within and between certain of our data centers is not established, is materially delayed, is discontinued or fails, our reputation could be harmed, which could have a material adverse effect on our ability to attract new customers or retain existing ones.

23


Table of Contents

Our data center infrastructure may become obsolete and we may not be able to upgrade our power and cooling systems cost-effectively or at all.

        The markets for the data centers that we own and operate, as well as the industries in which our customers operate, are characterized by rapidly changing technology, evolving industry standards, frequent new product introductions and changing customer demands. Our ability to deliver technologically sophisticated power and cooling are significant factors in our customers' decisions to rent space in our data centers. Our data center infrastructure may become obsolete due to the development of new systems to deliver power to, or eliminate heat from, the servers and other customer equipment that we house. Additionally, our data center infrastructure could become obsolete as a result of the development of new technology that requires levels of power and cooling that our facilities are not designed to provide. Our power and cooling systems are also difficult and expensive to upgrade. Accordingly, we may not be able to efficiently upgrade or change these systems to meet new demands without incurring significant costs that we may not be able to pass on to our customers. The obsolescence of our power and cooling systems would have a material adverse effect on our business. In addition, evolving customer demand could require services or infrastructure improvements that we do not provide or that would be difficult or expensive for us to provide in our current data centers, and we may be unable to adequately adapt our properties or acquire new properties that can compete successfully. We risk losing customers to our competitors if we are unable to adapt to this rapidly evolving marketplace.

        Furthermore, potential future regulations that apply to industries we serve may require customers in those industries to seek specific requirements from their data centers that we are unable to provide. These may include physical security requirements applicable to the defense industry and government contractors and privacy and security regulations applicable to the financial services and health care industries. If such regulations were adopted, we could lose some customers or be unable to attract new customers in certain industries, which would have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

Potential losses to our properties may not be covered by insurance or may exceed our policy coverage limits.

        We do not carry insurance for generally uninsured losses, such as acts of war. Our properties in our portfolio are subject to risks from earthquakes, tropical storms, hurricanes and floods. While we do carry earthquake, hurricane and flood insurance on our properties, the amount of our insurance coverage may not be sufficient to fully cover such losses. In addition, we may discontinue earthquake, hurricane or flood insurance on some or all of our properties in the future if the cost of premiums for any of these policies exceeds, in our judgment, the value of the coverage relative to the risk of loss.

        If we experience a loss which is uninsured or which exceeds our policy coverage limits, we could lose the capital invested in the damaged properties as well as the anticipated future cash flows from those properties.

        In addition, even if damage to our properties is covered by insurance, a disruption of our business caused by a casualty event may result in the loss of business or customers. We carry business interruption insurance, but such insurance may not fully compensate us for the loss of business or customers due to an interruption caused by a casualty event.

        While we monitor the solvency of our insurance carriers, it can be difficult to evaluate the stability and net assets or capitalization of insurance companies, and any insurer's ability to meet its claim payment obligations. A failure of an insurance company to make payments to us upon an event of loss covered by an insurance policy could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

24


Table of Contents

A small number of customers account for a significant portion of our revenues, and the loss of any of these customers could significantly harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        We currently depend, and expect to continue to depend, upon a relatively small number of customers for a significant percentage of our net revenue. Our top ten customers accounted for an aggregate of approximately 34.9% of our total annualized rent as of December 31, 2013. Some of our customers may experience a downturn in their businesses or other factors that may weaken their financial condition and result in them failing to make timely rental payments, defaulting on their leases, reducing the level of interconnection services they obtain or the amount of space they lease from us or terminating their relationship with us. The loss of one or more of our significant customers or a customer exerting significant pricing pressure on us could also have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

        In addition, our largest customers may choose to develop new data centers or expand existing data centers of their own. In the event that any of our key customers were to do so, it could result in a loss of business to us or increase pricing pressure on us. If we lose a customer, there is no guarantee that we would be able to replace that customer at a comparative rental rate or at all.

        Some of our largest customers may also compete with one another in various aspects of their businesses. The competitive pressures on our customers may have a negative impact on our operations. For instance, one customer could determine that it is not in that customer's interest to house mission-critical servers in a facility operated by the same company that relies on a key competitor for a significant part of its annual revenue. Our loss of a large customer for this or any other reason could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

We are dependent upon third-party suppliers for power and certain other services, and we are vulnerable to service failures of our third-party suppliers and to price increases by such suppliers.

        We rely on third parties to provide power to our data centers, and we cannot ensure that these third parties will deliver such power in adequate quantities or on a consistent basis. If the amount of power available to us is inadequate to support our customer requirements, we may be unable to satisfy our obligations to our customers or grow our business. In addition, our data centers are susceptible to power shortages and planned or unplanned power outages caused by these shortages. While we attempt to limit exposure to power shortages by using backup generators and batteries, power outages may last beyond our backup and alternative power arrangements, which would harm our customers and our business. In the past, a limited number of our customers have experienced temporary losses of power. Pursuant to the terms of some of our customer leases, continuous or chronic power outages may give certain of our tenants the right to terminate their leases or cause us to incur financial obligations in connection with a power loss. In addition, any loss of services or equipment damage could reduce the confidence of our customers in our services thereby impairing our ability to attract and retain customers, which would adversely affect both our ability to generate revenues and our operating results, and harm our reputation.

        In addition, we may be subject to risks and unanticipated costs associated with obtaining power from various utility companies. Municipal utilities in areas experiencing financial distress may increase rates to compensate for financial shortfalls unrelated to either the cost of production or the demand for electricity. Other utilities that serve our data centers may be dependent on, and sensitive to price increases for, a particular type of fuel, such as coal, oil or natural gas. In addition, the price of these fuels and the electricity generated from them could increase as a result of proposed legislative measures related to climate change including efforts to regulate carbon emissions and increase supply from more expensive renewable energy sources. In any of these cases, increases in the cost of power at any of our data centers would put those locations at a competitive disadvantage relative to data centers served by utilities that can provide less expensive power.

25


Table of Contents

We may be unable to identify and complete acquisitions and successfully operate acquired properties.

        We continually evaluate the market for available properties and may acquire data centers or properties suited for data center development when opportunities exist. Our ability to acquire properties on favorable terms and successfully develop and operate them involves significant risks including, but not limited to:

        In the past we have acquired properties that did not perform up to our expectations and there can be no assurance that this will not happen again. If we are unable to successfully acquire, develop and operate data center properties, our ability to grow our business, compete and meet market expectations will be significantly impaired, which would have a material adverse effect on the price of our common stock.

We may be subject to unknown or contingent liabilities related to properties or businesses that we acquire for which we may have limited or no recourse against the sellers.

        Assets and entities that we have acquired or may acquire in the future, including the properties contributed by the Funds or their affiliates, may be subject to unknown or contingent liabilities for which we may have limited or no recourse against the sellers. Unknown or contingent liabilities might include liabilities for clean-up or remediation of environmental conditions, claims of customers, vendors or other persons dealing with the acquired entities, tax liabilities and other liabilities whether incurred in the ordinary course of business or otherwise. In the future we may enter into transactions with limited representations and warranties or with representations and warranties that do not survive the closing of the transactions, in which event we would have no or limited recourse against the sellers of such properties. While we usually require the sellers to indemnify us with respect to breaches of representations and warranties that survive, such indemnification (including the indemnification by the Funds or their affiliates) is often limited and subject to various materiality thresholds, a significant deductible or an aggregate cap on losses.

26


Table of Contents

        As a result, there is no guarantee that we will recover any amounts with respect to losses due to breaches by the sellers of their representations and warranties. In addition, the total amount of costs and expenses that we may incur with respect to liabilities associated with acquired properties and entities may exceed our expectations, which may adversely affect our operating results and financial condition. Finally, indemnification agreements between us and the sellers typically provide that the sellers will retain certain specified liabilities relating to the assets and entities acquired by us. While the sellers are generally contractually obligated to pay all losses and other expenses relating to such retained liabilities, there can be no guarantee that such arrangements will not require us to incur losses or other expenses as well.

        Under the contribution agreement pursuant to which the Funds or their affiliates contributed the properties that comprise our portfolio to the Operating Partnership, each of the Funds or their affiliates made certain representations and warranties as to certain material matters related to the property being contributed by such fund or affiliate such as title to any owned property, compliance with laws (including environmental laws) and the enforceability of certain material customer contracts and leases. These representations and warranties made by the Funds or their affiliates have since expired without our becoming aware of any breach. Therefore, we have no further recourse against the contributors under the contribution agreement.

Our growth depends on the successful development of our properties and any delays or unexpected costs associated with such projects may harm our growth prospects, future operating results and financial condition.

        As of December 31, 2013, we had the ability to expand our operating data center square footage by approximately 946,000 NRSF, or 66%, refer to our development table in Item 1. Our growth depends upon the successful completion of the development of this space and similar projects in the future. Current and future development projects and expansion into new markets will involve substantial planning, allocation of significant company resources and certain risks, including risks related to financing, zoning, regulatory approvals, construction costs and delays. These projects will also require us to carefully select and rely on the experience of one or more general contractors and associated subcontractors during the construction process. Should a general contractor or significant subcontractor experience financial or other problems during the construction process, we could experience significant delays, increased costs to complete the project and other negative impacts to our expected financial returns. Site selection in current and expansion markets is also a critical factor in our expansion plans, and there may not be suitable properties available in our markets at a location that is attractive to our customers and has the necessary combination of access to multiple network providers, a significant supply of electrical power, high ceilings and the ability to sustain heavy floor loading. Furthermore, while we may prefer to locate new data centers adjacent to our existing data centers, we may be limited by the size and location of suitable properties.

        In addition, we will be subject to risks and, potentially, unanticipated costs associated with obtaining access to a sufficient amount of power from local utilities, including the need, in some cases, to develop utility substations on our properties in order to accommodate our power needs, constraints on the amount of electricity that a particular locality's power grid is capable of providing at any given time, and risks associated with the negotiation of long-term power contracts with utility providers. We cannot assure you that we will be able to successfully negotiate such contracts on acceptable terms or at all. Any inability to negotiate utility contracts on a timely basis or on acceptable financial terms or in volumes sufficient to supply the requisite power for our development properties would have a material negative impact on our growth and future results of operations and financial condition.

        These and other risks could result in delays or increased costs or prevent the completion of our development projects, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, cash flow, the trading price of our common stock and our ability to satisfy our debt service obligations or pay dividends.

27


Table of Contents

We do not own all of the buildings in which our data centers are located. Instead, we lease certain of our data center space and the ability to renew these leases could be a significant risk to our ongoing operations.

        We do not own the buildings for five of our data centers and our business could be harmed if we are unable to renew the leases for these data centers at favorable terms or at all. The following table summarizes the remaining primary term and renewal rights associated with each of our leased properties:

Property
  NRSF   Current
Lease Term
Expiration
  Renewal
Rights
  Base Rent Increases at Renewal

NY1

    48,613   Apr. 2023   2 × 5 yrs   FMR(1)

LA1

    157,778   July 2022   3 × 5 yrs   103% of previous monthly base rent

DC1

    22,137   May 2016   3 × 5 yrs   Greater of 103% of previous monthly base rent or 95% of FMR(1)

DE1

    4,144   Sept. 2019   1 × 5 yrs   103% of previous monthly base rent

DE2

    5,140   Dec. 2017   N/A    

(1)
FMR represents "fair market rent" as determined by mutual agreement between landlord and tenant, or in the case of a disagreement, mutual agreement by third party appraisers.

        When the primary term of our leases expire, we have the right to extend the terms of our leases as indicated above. For two of these leases, the rent will be determined based on the fair market value of rental rates for the property and the then prevailing rental rates may be higher than rental rates under the applicable lease. To maintain the operating profitability associated with our present cost structure, we must increase revenues within existing data centers to offset any potential increase in lease payments at the end of the original and renewal terms. Failure to increase revenues to sufficiently offset these projected higher costs would adversely impact our operating income. At the end of our renewal options, we would have to renegotiate our lease terms with the landlord.

        If we are not able to renew the lease at any of our data centers, the costs of relocating the equipment in such data centers and developing a new location into a high-quality data center could be prohibitive. In addition, we could lose customers due to the disruptions in their operations caused by the relocation. We could also lose those customers that choose our data centers based on their locations.

Our level of indebtedness and debt service obligations could have adverse effects on our business.

        As of December 31, 2013, we had a total indebtedness of approximately $232.5 million, of which $58.3 million is secured indebtedness and we had the ability to borrow up to an additional $222.4 million under our revolving credit facility, subject to satisfying certain financial tests. Subsequent to December 31, 2013, we entered into a $100 million senior unsecured term loan and used the proceeds to pay down outstanding debt. While there are limits in our revolving credit facility, senior unsecured term loan and our mortgage loan agreement on the amount of debt that we may incur, and additional limits on our indebtedness may be imposed by future agreements or by a policy adopted by our Board of Directors, we have the ability to increase our indebtedness over current levels. A substantial increase in our indebtedness may have adverse consequences for our business, results of operations and financial condition because it could, among other things:

28


Table of Contents

The agreements governing our indebtedness place restrictions on us and our subsidiaries, reducing operational flexibility and creating default risks.

        The agreements governing our indebtedness contain covenants that place restrictions on us and our subsidiaries. These covenants may restrict, among other things, our and our subsidiaries' ability to:

        These covenants could impair our ability to grow our business, take advantage of attractive business opportunities or successfully compete. In addition, our revolving credit facility requires us to maintain specified financial ratios and satisfy financial condition tests. Our ability to comply with these ratios or tests may be affected by events beyond our control, including prevailing economic, financial and industry conditions. A breach of any of these covenants or covenants under any other agreements governing our indebtedness could result in an event of default. Cross-default provisions in our debt agreements could cause an event of default under one debt agreement to trigger an event of default under our other debt agreements. Upon the occurrence of an event of default under any of our debt agreements, the lenders could elect to declare all outstanding debt under such agreements to be immediately due and payable. If we were unable to repay or refinance the accelerated debt, the lenders could proceed against any assets pledged to secure that debt, including foreclosing on or requiring the sale of our data centers, and our assets may not be sufficient to repay such debt in full.

29


Table of Contents

Fluctuations in interest rates could materially affect our financial results

        Because all of our debt bears interest at variable rates, increases in interest rates could materially increase our interest expense. If the United States Federal Reserve increases short-term interest rates, this would have a significant upward impact on shorter-term interest rates, including the interest rates that our variable rate debt is based upon. Potential future increases in interest rates and credit spreads may increase our interest expense and therefore negatively affect our financial condition and results of operations, and reduce our access to capital markets.

Because we depend on the development and growth of a balanced customer base, including key customers, failure to attract, grow and retain this base of customers could harm our business and operating results.

        Our ability to maximize operating revenues depends on our ability to develop and grow a balanced customer base, consisting of a variety of companies, including enterprises, cloud and IT service providers, digital content and multimedia providers, systems integrators and managed services providers and networks and mobility. We consider certain of these customers to be key in that they draw in other customers. The more balanced the customer base within each data center, the better we will be able to generate significant interconnection revenues, which in turn increases our overall operating revenues. Our ability to attract customers to our data centers will depend on a variety of factors, including the presence of multiple carriers, the mix of products and services offered by us, the overall mix of customers, the presence of key customers attracting business through vertical market ecosystems, the data center's operating reliability and security and our ability to effectively market our services. However, some of our customers may face competitive pressures and may ultimately not be successful or may be consolidated through merger or acquisition. If these customers do not continue to use our data centers it may be disruptive to our business. Finally, the uncertain economic climate may harm our ability to attract and retain customers if customers slow spending, or delay decision-making, on our products and services, or if customers begin to have difficulty paying us and we experience increased churn in our customer base. Any of these factors may hinder the development, growth and retention of a balanced customer base and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Certain of the properties in our portfolio have been owned or operated for a limited period of time, and we may not be aware of characteristics or deficiencies involving any one or all of them.

        As of December 31, 2013, our portfolio of properties consisted of 16 operating data center facilities and multiple development projects. Eleven of our properties were acquired or developed by the Funds or their affiliates less than four years prior to the date of our IPO and we recently completed the initial development of three of these properties. Because these properties have been in operation for a relatively short period of time, we may be unaware of characteristics of or deficiencies in such properties that could adversely affect their valuation or revenue generating potential and such properties may not ultimately perform up to our expectations.

30


Table of Contents

Our tax protection agreements could limit our ability to sell or otherwise dispose of certain properties.

        We have agreed with each of the Funds or their affiliates that have directly or indirectly contributed their interests in the properties in our portfolio to our operating partnership that if we directly or indirectly sell, convey, transfer or otherwise dispose of all or any portion of these interests in a taxable transaction, we will make an interest-free loan to the contributors in an amount equal to the contributor's tax liabilities, based on an assumed tax rate, with respect to built-in gains generated from the initial contribution. Any such loan would be repayable out of the after tax-proceeds (based on an assumed tax rate) of any distribution from the operating partnership to, or any sale of operating partnership units (or common stock issued by us in exchange for such units) by, the recipient of such loan, and would be non-recourse to the borrower other than with respect to such proceeds. These tax protection provisions apply for a period expiring on the earliest of (i) the seventh anniversary of the completion of our IPO and (ii) the date on which these contributors (or certain transferees) dispose in certain taxable transactions of 90% of the operating partnership units that were issued to them in connection with the contribution of these properties.

Increases in our property and other state and local taxes could adversely affect our ability to make distributions to our stockholders if they cannot be passed on to our customers.

        We are subject to a variety of state and local taxes, including real and personal property taxes and sales and use taxes that may increase materially due to factors outside our control. In particular, real estate taxes on our properties may increase as tax rates change and as the properties are assessed or reassessed by taxing authorities. We expect to be notified by local taxing authorities that the assessed values of certain of our properties have increased. We plan to appeal these increased assessments, but we may not be successful in our efforts. Furthermore, some of our properties may be reassessed retroactively to the date we or the Funds acquired the property, which could require us to make cumulative payments for multiple years. Our leases with our customers generally do not allow us to increase their rent as a result of an increase in real estate or other taxes. If real estate or other taxes increase and we cannot pass these increases on to our customers through increased rent for new leases or upon lease renewals, our result of operations, cash flow and ability to make distributions to our stockholders would be adversely affected.

The bankruptcy or insolvency of a major tenant may adversely affect the income produced by our properties.

        If any tenant becomes a debtor in a case under the federal Bankruptcy Code, we cannot evict the tenant solely because of the bankruptcy. In addition, the bankruptcy court might authorize the tenant to reject and terminate its lease with us. Our claim against the tenant for unpaid, future rent would be subject to a statutory cap that might be substantially less than the remaining rent actually owed under the lease. In either case, our claim for unpaid rent would likely not be paid in full. As of December 31, 2013, we had no material tenants in bankruptcy. Our revenue and cash available for distribution could be materially adversely affected if any of our significant tenants were to become bankrupt or insolvent, or suffer a downturn in its business, or fail to renew its lease or renew on terms less favorable to us than its current terms.

31


Table of Contents

We are exposed to potential risks from errors in our financial reporting systems and controls, including the potential for material misstatements in our consolidated financial statements.

        Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requires companies to evaluate their internal control over financial reporting. We performed our evaluation as of December 31, 2013, and believe internal control over financial reporting is operating effectively. We also received an unqualified opinion regarding the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2013. Although we believe internal control over financial reporting is operating effectively, in the course of our internal audit program we have identified certain areas for ongoing improvement and we are in the process of evaluating and designing enhanced business processes and controls to address such areas, none of which we believe constitutes a material change. However, we cannot be certain that our efforts will be effective or sufficient for us, or our independent registered public accounting firm, to issue unqualified audit reports in the future, especially as our business continues to grow and evolve and as we acquire other businesses.

        Our ability to manage our operations and growth will require us to improve our operational, financial and management controls, as well as our internal reporting systems and controls. We may not be able to implement improvements to our internal reporting systems and controls in an efficient and timely manner and have in the past, and may in the future, discover deficiencies in existing systems and controls. In addition, internal reporting systems and controls are subject to human error. Any such deficiencies could result in material misstatements in our consolidated financial statements, which might involve restating previously issued financial statements. Additionally, as we expand, we will need to implement new systems to support our financial reporting business processes and controls. We may not be able to implement these systems such that errors would be identified in a timely manner, which could result in material misstatements in our consolidated financial statements.

In prior years, we have experienced significant losses and we cannot assure you that we will maintain profitability.

        For fiscal years 2011 and 2010, on a consolidated basis, we had net losses of $10.8 million and $12.3 million, respectively. Our ability to maintain profitability is dependent upon a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in executing our business strategy and maintain profitability. Our failure to do so could have a material adverse effect on the price of our common stock and our ability to satisfy our obligations, including making payments on our indebtedness. Even if we maintain profitability in 2014, given the competitive nature of the industry in which we operate, we may not be able to sustain or increase profitability in future periods.

Illiquidity of real estate investments, particularly our data centers, could significantly impede our ability to respond to adverse changes in the performance of our properties, which could harm our financial condition.

        Because real estate investments are relatively illiquid, our ability to promptly sell one or more properties in our portfolio in response to adverse changes in the real estate market or in the performance of such properties may be limited, thus harming our financial condition. The real estate market is affected by many factors that are beyond our control, including:

32


Table of Contents

        The risks associated with the illiquidity of real estate investments are even greater for our data center properties. Our data centers are highly specialized real estate assets containing extensive electrical and mechanical systems that are uniquely designed to house and maintain our customers' equipment and, as such, have little, if any, traditional office space. As a result, most of our data centers are not suited for use by customers as anything other than as data centers and major renovations and expenditures would be required in order for us to re-lease data center space for more traditional commercial or industrial uses, or for us to sell a property to a buyer for use other than as a data center.

Environmental problems are possible and can be costly.

        Environmental liabilities could arise and have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and performance. Federal, state and local laws and regulations relating to the protection of the environment may require a current or previous owner or operator of real estate to investigate and remediate hazardous or toxic substances or petroleum product releases at or from the property. In addition, we could incur costs to comply with such laws and regulations, the violation of which could lead to substantial fines and penalties.

        We may have to pay governmental entities or third parties for property damage and for investigation and remediation costs that they incurred in connection with any contamination at our current and former properties without regard to whether we knew of or caused the presence of the contaminants. Even if more than one person may have been responsible for the contamination, each person covered by these environmental laws may be held responsible for all of the clean-up costs incurred.

        Some of our properties contain or may contain asbestos-containing building materials. Environmental laws may impose fines and penalties on building owners or operators who fail to properly manage and maintain these materials, notify and train persons who may come into contact with asbestos and undertake special precautions, and third parties could potentially seek recovery from owners or operators for any personal injury associated with exposure to asbestos-containing building materials.

        Some of our properties may also contain or develop harmful mold or suffer from other air quality issues. As a result, the presence of significant mold or other airborne contaminants at any of our properties could require us to undertake a costly remediation program to contain or remove the mold or other airborne contaminants from the affected property or increase indoor ventilation. In addition, the presence of significant mold or other airborne contaminants could expose us to liability from our customers, employees of our customers and others if property damage or health concerns arise.

We may incur significant costs complying with the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, and similar laws, which could materially adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.

        Under the ADA, all places of public accommodation must meet federal requirements related to access and use by disabled persons. A number of additional federal, state and local laws may also require modifications to our properties. We have not conducted an audit or investigation of all of our properties to determine our compliance with the ADA. If one of our properties is not in compliance with the ADA, we would be required to incur additional costs to bring the property into compliance. Additional federal, state and local laws may require modifications to our properties, or restrict our ability to renovate our properties. We cannot predict the ultimate amount of the cost of compliance with the ADA or other legislation. If we incur substantial costs to comply with the ADA and any other similar legislation, our financial condition and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.

33


Table of Contents

Future consolidation in the technology industry could materially adversely affect our revenues by eliminating some of our potential customers and could make us more dependent on a more limited number of customers.

        Mergers or consolidations of technology companies in the future could reduce the number of our customers and potential customers. If our customers merge with or are acquired by other entities that are not our customers, they may discontinue or reduce the use of our data centers in the future. Any of these developments could have a material adverse effect on our revenues and results of operations.

We may be adversely affected by regulations related to climate change.

        Climate change regulation is a rapidly developing area. Congress is currently considering new laws relating to climate change, including potential cap-and-trade systems, carbon taxes and other requirements relating to reduction of carbon footprints and/or greenhouse gas emissions. Other countries have enacted climate change laws and regulations and the United States has been involved in discussions regarding international climate change treaties. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA, and some of the states and localities in which we operate, have also enacted certain climate change laws and regulations and/or have begun regulating carbon footprints and greenhouse gas emissions. Although these laws and regulations have not had an adverse effect on our business to date, they could limit our ability to develop new facilities or result in substantial compliance costs, retrofit costs and construction costs, including capital expenditures for environmental control facilities and other new equipment. We could also face a negative impact on our reputation with the public if we violate climate change laws or regulations.


Risks Related to Our Organizational Structure

Our Board of Directors may change our major corporate, investment and financing policies without stockholder approval and those changes may adversely affect our business.

        Our Board of Directors will determine our major corporate policies, including our acquisition, investment, financing, growth, operations and level of indebtedness and distribution policies and whether to maintain our status as a REIT. Our Board of Directors may alter or eliminate our current corporate policies, including our policy on borrowing at any time without stockholder approval. Accordingly, while our stockholders have the power to elect or remove directors, our stockholders will have limited direct control over changes in our policies and those changes could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, the market price of our common and preferred stock and our ability to make distributions to our stockholders.

34


Table of Contents

While the Funds and their affiliates do not control our company, they own a majority of our Operating Partnership and have the right initially to nominate two directors, and their interests may differ from or conflict with the interests of our stockholders.

        As of December 31, 2013, the Funds or their affiliates had an aggregate beneficial common ownership interest in our Operating Partnership of approximately 54.8% which, if exchanged for our common stock, would represent approximately 54.3% of our outstanding common stock. In addition, the operating agreement for our Operating Partnership grants the Funds and their affiliates the right to initially nominate two of the seven directors to our Board of Directors. As a result, the Funds and their affiliates have the ability to exercise substantial influence over our company, including with respect to decisions relating to our capital structure, issuing additional shares of our common stock or other equity securities, paying dividends, incurring additional debt, making acquisitions, selling properties or other assets, merging with other companies and undertaking other extraordinary transactions. In any of these matters, the interests of the Funds and their affiliates may differ from or conflict with the interests of our other stockholders. In addition, the Funds and their affiliates are in the business of making investments in companies and may, from time to time, acquire interests in businesses that directly or indirectly compete with our business, as well as businesses that are significant existing or potential customers. The Funds and their affiliates may acquire or seek to acquire assets that we seek to acquire and, as a result, those acquisition opportunities may not be available to us or may be more expensive for us to pursue.

Our charter and bylaws contain provisions that may delay, defer or prevent an acquisition of our common stock or a change in control, which may not be in the best interests of our stockholders.

        Our charter and bylaws contain a number of provisions, the exercise or existence of which could delay, defer or prevent a transaction or a change in control that might involve a premium price for our stockholders or otherwise be in their best interests, including the following:

35


Table of Contents

Certain provisions of Maryland law may limit the ability of a third party to acquire control of us.

        Certain provisions of the Maryland General Corporation Law, or MGCL, may have the effect of inhibiting a third party from making a proposal to acquire us or of impeding a change of control under circumstances that otherwise could provide our common stockholders with the opportunity to realize a premium over the then-prevailing market price of such shares, including:

        We have opted out of these provisions of the MGCL, in the case of the business combination provisions of the MGCL, by resolution of our Board of Directors and, in the case of the control share provisions of the MGCL, by a provision in our bylaws. However, our Board of Directors may elect to opt into these provisions, if approved by our stockholders by the affirmative vote of a majority of votes cast and with the consent of the Funds or their affiliates, provided that the consent of the Funds will not be required unless, in the case of the control share provisions, such provisions would apply to the Funds and their affiliates or in either case at such time they own less than 10% of our outstanding common stock (assuming all operating partnership units are exchanged into common stock).

        Additionally, Title 3, Subtitle 8 of the MGCL permits our Board of Directors, without stockholder approval and regardless of what is currently provided in our charter or bylaws, to implement certain takeover defenses, such as a classified board, some of which we do not yet have.

36


Table of Contents

Preferred stock is senior to our common stock upon liquidation and for the purpose of distributions and may cause the market price of our common stock to decline.

        In December 2012, we sold 4.6 million shares of 7.25% Series A Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock in an underwritten public offering. Upon liquidation, holders of our shares of preferred stock will receive a distribution of our available assets prior to the holders of our common stock. Additional equity offerings may dilute the holdings of our existing stockholders or reduce the market price of our common stock, or both. Holders of our common stock are not entitled to preemptive rights or other protections against dilution. As data center acquisition or development opportunities arise from time to time, we may issue additional shares of common stock or preferred stock to raise the capital necessary to finance these acquisitions or developments or may issue common stock or preferred stock or OP units, which are redeemable for, at our option, cash or our common stock on a one-to-one basis, to acquire such properties. Such issuances could result in dilution of stockholders' equity. Thus, our stockholders bear the risk of our future offerings reducing the market price of our common stock and diluting their interest.

Failure to qualify as a REIT would have material adverse consequences to us and the value of our stock.

        We have elected to be taxed and to operate in a manner that will allow us to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes under the Code. However, we cannot assure you that we will remain qualified as a REIT. If, in any taxable year, we lose our REIT status, we will face serious tax consequences that would substantially reduce our cash available for distribution to our stockholders for each of the years involved because:

        Our failure to qualify as a REIT could also impair our ability to expand our business and raise capital, and would materially adversely affect the value of our common stock and preferred stock.

Failure to qualify as a domestically controlled REIT could subject our non-U.S. stockholders to adverse federal income tax consequences.

        We will remain a domestically controlled REIT if, at all times during a specified testing period, less than 50% in value of our shares is held directly or indirectly by non-U.S. stockholders. However, because our shares are publicly traded, we cannot guarantee that we will maintain the qualifications to be a domestically-controlled REIT. If we fail to qualify as a domestically-controlled REIT, our non-U.S. stockholders that otherwise would not be subject to federal income tax on the gain attributable to a sale of our shares of common stock would be subject to taxation upon such a sale if either (1) the shares of common stock were not considered to be regularly traded under applicable Treasury Regulations on an established securities market, such as the NYSE, or (2) the selling non-U.S. stockholder owned, actually or constructively, more than 5% in value of the outstanding shares of common stock being sold during specified testing periods. If gain on the sale or exchange of our shares of common stock was subject to taxation for these reasons, the non-U.S. stockholder would be subject to regular U.S. income tax with respect to any gain on a net basis in a manner similar to the taxation of a taxable U.S. stockholder, subject to any applicable alternative minimum tax and special alternative minimum tax in the case of nonresident alien individuals, and corporate non-U.S. stockholders may be subject to an additional branch profits tax.

37


Table of Contents

Our cash available for distribution to stockholders may not be sufficient to pay distributions at expected levels or at all, and we may be required to borrow funds on a short-term basis during unfavorable market conditions.

        In order to maintain our qualification as a REIT, we are required under the Code to distribute at least 90% of our net taxable income annually to our stockholders. In any period our net taxable income may be greater than our cash flow from operations, requiring us to fund such distributions from other sources, including borrowed funds, even if the market conditions are not favorable for these borrowings. In addition, we may become party to debt agreements that include cash management or similar provisions, pursuant to which revenues generated by properties subject to such indebtedness are immediately, or upon the occurrence of certain events, swept into an account for the benefit of the lenders under such debt agreements, which revenues would typically only become available to us after the funding of reserve accounts for, among other things, debt service, taxes, insurance and leasing commissions. In any event, if our properties do not generate sufficient cash flow to satisfy our REIT distribution obligations, we may be required to fund distributions from working capital, borrowings under our revolving credit facility, the sale of assets or debt or equity financing, some or all of which may not be available or may not be available on favorable market conditions. As a result, any failure to generate cash greater than our REIT distribution obligation could have a material adverse effect on the price of our common stock.

Dividends payable by REITs do not qualify for the reduced tax rates available for some dividends.

        For taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2013, the maximum tax rate applicable to "qualified dividends" paid to U.S. shareholders that are individuals, trusts and estates is 23.8% (taking into account the 3.8% Medicare tax applicable to net investment income). Dividends payable by REITs, however, generally are not eligible for the reduced rates and will continue to be subject to tax at rates applicable to ordinary income, which will be as high as 43.4% (taking into account the 3.8% Medicare tax applicable to net investment income). The more favorable tax rates applicable to regular corporate qualified dividends could cause investors who are individuals, trusts and estates to perceive investments in REITs to be relatively less attractive than investments in the shares of non-REIT corporations that pay dividends, which could adversely affect the value of the shares of REITs, including our common shares.

Legislative or other actions affecting REITs could have a negative effect on us.

        The rules dealing with federal income taxation are constantly under review by persons involved in the legislative process and by the IRS and the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Changes to the tax laws, with or without retroactive application, could materially and adversely affect CoreSite Realty Corporation's stockholders, Operating Partnership unit holders and/or us. We cannot predict how changes in the tax laws might affect our investors and/or us. New legislation, Treasury Regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions could significantly and negatively affect CoreSite Realty Corporation's ability to qualify as a REIT or the federal income tax consequences of such qualification.

Applicable REIT laws may restrict certain business activities.

        As a REIT we are subject to various restrictions on our income, assets and activities. These include restrictions on our ability to pursue certain strategic acquisitions or business combinations and our ability to enter into other lines of business. Due to these restrictions, we anticipate that we will conduct certain business activities in one or more taxable REIT subsidiaries. Our taxable REIT subsidiaries are taxable as regular C corporations and are subject to federal, state, local and, if applicable, foreign taxation on their taxable income at applicable corporate income tax rates. However, we may still be limited in the business activities we can pursue.

38


Table of Contents

Despite our REIT status, we remain subject to various taxes.

        Notwithstanding our status as a REIT, we will be subject to certain federal, state and local taxes on our income and property. For example, we will pay tax on certain types of income that we do not distribute and we will incur a 100% excise tax on transactions with our TRS entities that are not conducted on an arm's length basis. Moreover, our TRS entities are taxable as a regular C corporation and will pay federal, state and local income tax on their net income at the applicable corporate rates.

If the structural components of our properties were not treated as real property for purposes of the REIT qualification requirements, we would fail to qualify as a REIT.

        A significant portion of the value of our properties is attributable to structural components related to the provision of electricity, heating, ventilation and air conditioning, humidification regulation, security and fire protection, and telecommunication services. We have received a private letter ruling from the Internal Revenue Service (the "IRS"), holding, among other things, that our buildings, including the structural components, constitute real property for purposes of the REIT qualification requirements. We are entitled to rely upon that private letter ruling only to the extent that we did not misstate or omit a material fact in the ruling request we submitted to the IRS and that we operate in the future in accordance with the material facts described in that request. Moreover, the IRS, in its sole discretion, may revoke the private letter ruling. If our structural components are subsequently determined not to constitute real property for purposes of the REIT qualification requirements, including as a result of our being unable to rely upon the private letter ruling or the IRS revoking that ruling, we would fail to qualify as a REIT, which could have a material adverse effect on the value of our common stock.

If interconnection services were not treated as qualifying income for purposes of the REIT qualification requirements, we may fail to qualify as a REIT.

        Interconnection services are a fundamental and growing part of our business. Based on representations we have made to the IRS that this activity is ordinary, necessary, usual, and customary in connection with the operation of our data center properties and those properties with similar character to ours, we have received a private letter ruling, holding, among other things, that amounts received from our customers for interconnection services will not be treated as other than "rents from real property" under the Code. We are entitled to rely upon that private letter ruling only to the extent that we did not misstate or omit a material fact in the ruling request we submitted to the IRS and that we operate in the future in accordance with the material facts described in that request. Moreover, the IRS, in its sole discretion, may revoke the private letter ruling. If the revenue associated with our interconnection activity was determined to be non-qualifying REIT income, including as a result of our being unable to rely upon the private letter ruling or the IRS revoking that ruling, there would be significant risk to our ability to qualify as a REIT, which could have a material adverse effect on the value of our common stock.

ITEM 1B.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

        None.

ITEM 2.    PROPERTIES

        The information set forth under the caption "Our Portfolio" in Item 1 of this Annual Report is incorporated by reference herein.

39


Table of Contents


ITEM 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

        From time to time, we are party to a variety of legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business. We believe that, with respect to any such matters to which we currently are a party, the ultimate disposition of any such matter will not result in a material adverse effect on us.

ITEM 4.    MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

        Not applicable.

40


Table of Contents


PART II

ITEM 5.    MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information and Holders

        Our common stock has been listed and is traded on the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") under the symbol "COR" since September 23, 2010. As of February 12, 2014, we had eight holders of record of our common stock. This figure does not reflect the beneficial ownership of shares held in nominee name. The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the high and low sale prices in dollars on the NYSE for our common stock and the dividends we declared with respect to the periods indicated.

 
  Price Range    
 
 
  Dividends
Declared
 
 
  High   Low  

2013:

                   

Fourth Quarter

  $ 34.82   $ 27.51   $ 0.35  

Third Quarter

  $ 36.00   $ 29.92   $ 0.27  

Second Quarter

  $ 38.57   $ 28.84   $ 0.27  

First Quarter

  $ 35.38   $ 28.11   $ 0.27  

2012:

   
 
   
 
   
 
 

Fourth Quarter

  $ 27.99   $ 20.50   $ 0.27  

Third Quarter

  $ 28.00   $ 25.36   $ 0.18  

Second Quarter

  $ 26.10   $ 22.53   $ 0.18  

First Quarter

  $ 24.74   $ 17.96   $ 0.18  

Distributions and Dividends

        In order to comply with the REIT requirements of the Code, we generally are required to make annual distributions to our shareholders of at least 90% of our taxable net income. Our common share distribution policy is to distribute as dividends a percentage of our cash flow that ensures that we will meet the distribution requirements of the Code and that allows us to maximize the cash retained for meeting other cash needs, such as capital improvements and other investment activities.

        We have made distributions in the form of dividends in every quarter since the completion of our IPO. While we plan to continue to make quarterly distributions, no assurances can be made as to the frequency or amounts of any future distributions. The payment of common share distributions is dependent upon our financial condition, operating results and REIT distribution requirements and may be adjusted at the discretion of our Board of Directors during the year. Dividends declared in the past two fiscal years are noted in the chart above.

41


Table of Contents

Performance Graph

        The following line graph sets forth, for the period from September 23, 2010, through December 31, 2013, a comparison of the percentage change in the cumulative total stockholder return on our common stock compared to the cumulative total return of the S&P 500 Market Index and the MSCI US REIT Index ("RMS"). The graph assumes that $100 was invested on September 23, 2010, in shares of our common stock and each of the aforementioned indices and that all dividends were reinvested without the payment of any commissions. There can be no assurance that the performance of our shares will continue in line with the same or similar trends depicted in the graph below.

GRAPHIC

Pricing Date
  COR   S&P 500   MSCI US REIT  

September 23, 2010

  $ 100.0   $ 100.0   $ 100.0  

September 30, 2010

  $ 102.4   $ 101.5   $ 101.7  

December 31, 2010

  $ 86.0   $ 112.4   $ 109.2  

March 31, 2011

  $ 100.7   $ 119.1   $ 116.3  

June 30, 2011

  $ 105.1   $ 119.2   $ 120.5  

September 30, 2011

  $ 92.8   $ 102.6   $ 103.0  

December 31, 2011

  $ 116.4   $ 114.8   $ 118.7  

March 31, 2012

  $ 155.2   $ 129.2   $ 131.5  

June 30, 2012

  $ 171.1   $ 125.7   $ 136.4  

September 30, 2012

  $ 179.8   $ 133.7   $ 136.4  

December 31, 2012

  $ 186.4   $ 133.2   $ 140.0  

March 31, 2013

  $ 237.6   $ 147.3   $ 151.1  

June 30, 2013

  $ 218.0   $ 151.6   $ 148.7  

September 30, 2013

  $ 234.4   $ 159.5   $ 144.2  

December 31, 2013

  $ 224.7   $ 176.3   $ 143.3  

SALES OF UNREGISTERED EQUITY SECURITIES

        None.

42


Table of Contents

REPURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

        None.

ITEM 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

        On September 28, 2010, we closed our IPO and completed the acquisition of our Predecessor and the CoreSite Acquired Properties. As such, the financial condition and results of operations for the entities acquired by our Predecessor in connection with the IPO and related formation transactions are only included in the condensed consolidated financial statements since the date of the transactions. Prior to September 28, 2010, the date of these transactions, the condensed consolidated financial statements include only the activities and capital structure of our Predecessor.

 
  The Company   Historical Predecessor  
(in thousands except share and
per share data)
  Year ended
December 31,
2013
  Year ended
December 31,
2012
  Year ended
December 31,
2011
  For the period
September 28, 2010,
through
December 31, 2010
  For the period
January 1, 2010,
through
September 27, 2010
  Year ended
December 31,
2009
 

Statement of Operations Data

                                     

Operating revenues

  $ 234,833   $ 206,934   $ 172,846   $ 38,352   $ 35,557   $ 28,831  

Operating expenses:

                                     

Property operating and maintenance

    64,260     61,235     55,049     12,107     14,272     13,954  

Real estate taxes and insurance

    8,458     8,765     9,119     1,642     1,262     1,787  

Management fees to related party

                    3,582     2,244  

Depreciation and amortization

    65,785     64,327     68,967     19,146     11,848     11,193  

Sales and marketing

    14,405     10,330     5,744     1,341     125     135  

General and administrative

    27,317     25,910     21,846     4,987     2,258     1,401  

Rent

    19,659     18,711     18,336     4,551     2,177     2,816  

Transaction costs

    279     613     875     3,275          
                           

Total operating expenses

    200,163     189,891     179,936     47,049     35,524     33,530  
                           

Operating income (loss)

    34,670     17,043     (7,090 )   (8,697 )   33     (4,699 )

Interest expense

    (2,689 )   (5,236 )   (5,275 )   (2,325 )   (1,590 )   (2,343 )

Net income (loss)

    31,612     10,716     (10,779 )   (10,722 )   (1,555 )   (7,039 )

Net income (loss) attributable to noncontrolling interests

    12,771     5,668     (6,168 )   (7,371 )        
                           

Net income (loss) attributable to CoreSite Realty Corporation

  $ 18,841   $ 5,048   $ (4,611 ) $ (3,351 ) $ (1,555 ) $ (7,039 )
                           

Preferred stock dividends

    (8,338 )   (440 )                
                           

Net income (loss) attributable to common shares

  $ 10,503   $ 4,608   $ (4,611 ) $ (3,351 ) $ (1,555 ) $ (7,039 )
                           
                           

Earnings Per Share

                                     

Net income (loss) per share attributable to common shares

                                     

Basic

  $ 0.50   $ 0.22   $ (0.24 ) $ (0.17 )            

Diluted

    0.49     0.22     (0.24 )   (0.17 )            
                               
                               

Weighted average common shares outstanding

                                     

Basic

    20,826,622     20,537,946     19,609,375     19,458,605              

Diluted

    21,503,212     20,992,290     19,609,375     19,458,605              
                               
                               

Dividends declared per common share

  $ 1.16   $ 0.81   $ 0.57   $ 0.13              
                               

43


Table of Contents


 
  The Company   Historical
Predecessor
 
Balance Sheet Data
  2013   2012   December 31,
2011
  2010   2009  

Net investments in real estate

  $ 892,821   $ 724,075   $ 677,553   $ 591,179   $ 218,055  

Total Assets

    1,016,494     845,332     808,226     833,026     239,420  

Revolving credit facility

    174,250         5,000          

Mortgages and notes payable

    58,250     59,750     116,864     124,873     62,387  

Noncontrolling interests in operating partnership

    355,897     372,544     387,379     422,226      

Stockholders' equity / members' equity

    688,307     710,773     232,808     232,239     162,338  

 

 
  The Company   Historical Predecessor  
(in thousands)
  Year ended
December 31,
2013
  Year ended
December 31,
2012
  Year ended
December 31,
2011
  For the period
September 28, 2010
through
December 31, 2010
  For the period
January 1, 2010
through
September 27, 2010
  Year ended
December 31,
2009
 

Net income (loss)

  $ 31,612   $ 10,716   $ (10,779 ) $ (10,722 ) $ (1,555 ) $ (7,039 )

Real estate depreciation and amortization

    62,040     61,700     67,673     18,936     11,748     11,193  
                           

FFO

    93,652     72,416     56,894     8,214     10,193     4,154  

Preferred stock dividends

    (8,338 )   (440 )                
                           

FFO attributable to common shares and units

  $ 85,314   $ 71,976   $ 56,894   $ 8,214   $ 10,193   $ 4,154  
                           
                           

(1)
We consider funds from operations ("FFO"), a non-GAAP measure, to be a supplemental measure of our performance which should be considered along with, but not as an alternative to, net income and cash provided by operating activities as a measure of operating performance and liquidity. We calculate FFO in accordance with the standards established by the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts ("NAREIT"). FFO represents net income (loss) (computed in accordance with GAAP), excluding gains (or losses) from sales of property and impairment write-downs of depreciable real estate, plus real estate related depreciation and amortization (excluding amortization of deferred financing costs) and after adjustments for unconsolidated partnerships and joint ventures. FFO attributable to common shares and units represents FFO less preferred stock dividends declared during the period.

Our management uses FFO as a supplemental performance measure because, in excluding real estate related depreciation and amortization and gains and losses from property dispositions, it provides a performance measure that, when compared year over year, captures trends in occupancy rates, rental rates and operating costs.

We offer this measure because we recognize that FFO will be used by investors as a basis to compare our operating performance with that of other REITs. However, because FFO excludes depreciation and amortization and captures neither the changes in the value of our properties that result from use or market conditions, nor the level of capital expenditures and capitalized leasing commissions necessary to maintain the operating performance of our properties, all of which have real economic effect and could materially impact our financial condition and results from operations, the utility of FFO as a measure of our performance is limited. FFO is a non-GAAP measure and should not be considered a measure of liquidity, an alternative to net income, cash provided by operating activities or any other performance measure determined in accordance with GAAP, nor is it indicative of funds available to fund our cash needs, including our ability to pay dividends or make distributions. In addition, our calculations of FFO are not necessarily comparable to FFO as calculated by other REITs that do not use the same definition or implementation guidelines or interpret the standards differently from us. Investors in our securities should not rely on these measures as a substitute for any GAAP measure, including net income.

44


Table of Contents

ITEM 7.    MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

        You should read the following discussion and analysis of our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this report. Some of the information contained in this discussion and analysis or set forth elsewhere in this report, including information with respect to our plans and strategies for our business, statements regarding the industry outlook, our expectations regarding the future performance of our business and the other non-historical statements contained herein are forward-looking statements. See "Cautionary Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements." You should also review the "Risk Factors" in Item 1A. of this report for a discussion of important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results described herein or implied by such forward-looking statements.

Overview

        CoreSite Realty Corporation delivers network-dense, cloud-enabled, enterprise-class data center products and services across eight key North American markets. We are an owner, developer and operator of strategically located data centers in some of the largest and fastest growing data center markets in the United States, including the New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco Bay and Northern Virginia areas, Chicago, Boston, Miami and Denver. Our high-quality data centers feature ample and redundant power, advanced cooling and security systems and many are points of dense network interconnection. We are able to satisfy the full spectrum of our customers' data center requirements by providing data center space ranging in size from an entire building or large dedicated suites to a cage or cabinet. We lease our space to a broad and growing customer base ranging from enterprise customers to less space-intensive, more network-centric customers. Our operational flexibility allows us to selectively lease data center space to its highest and best use depending on customer demand, regional economies and property characteristics.

        As of December 31, 2013, our property portfolio included 16 operating data center facilities, multiple development projects and space and land held for development, which collectively comprise the potential for over 2.7 million NRSF, of which approximately 1.4 million NRSF is existing data center space. These stabilized properties include approximately 320,000 NRSF of space readily available for lease, of which approximately 243,000 NRSF is available for lease as data center space. Including the space currently under construction or in preconstruction at December 31, 2013, we own land and buildings sufficient to develop an additional 946,000 NRSF of data center space.

Factors which May Influence our Results of Operations

        Market and economic conditions.    We are impacted by general business and economic conditions in the United States. These conditions include short-term and long-term interest rates, inflation, money supply, political issues, legislative and regulatory changes, fluctuations in both debt and equity capital markets and broad trends in industry and finance, all of which are beyond our control. Macro-economic conditions that affect the economy and the economic outlook of the United States could adversely affect our customers and vendors, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

45


Table of Contents

        Operating revenue.    The amount of revenue generated by the properties in our portfolio depends on several factors, including our ability to maintain or improve the occupancy rates of currently leased space and to lease currently available and pre-stabilized space. Excluding pre-stabilized properties and space held for development, as of December 31, 2013, the occupancy rate of the data center properties in our portfolio was approximately 81.7% of our NRSF. Negative trends in one or more of these factors could adversely affect our operating revenue in future periods. Future economic downturns or regional downturns affecting our markets or downturns in the technology industry that impair our ability to renew or re-lease space and the ability of our customers to fulfill their lease commitments, as in the case of customer bankruptcies, could adversely affect our ability to maintain or increase operating revenue at our properties.

        Operating expenses.    Our operating expenses primarily consist of utility costs, including power, site maintenance, real estate taxes and insurance, personnel salaries and benefits, including stock based compensation, depreciation, as well as rental expenses on our properties in which we hold a leasehold interest. A substantial majority of our operating expenses is fixed in nature and should not vary significantly from period to period, unless we expand our existing data centers or acquire new data centers, which would entail additional operations, security and facility personnel, as well as utility, operating and maintenance expenses. Our buildings require significant power to support data center operations. We expect the cost of power will generally increase in the future on a per-unit or fixed basis in addition to the variable increase related to the growth in consumption by the customer. In addition, the cost of power is generally higher in summer months as compared to other times of the year. Furthermore, to the extent we incur increased electricity costs as a result of either climate change policies or the physical effects of climate change; such increased costs could materially impact our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

        Substantially all of our data center NRSF is subject to the breakered-amp or sub-metered (branch circuit monitoring) power pricing models. We recover all or substantially all of our electricity costs for our leased data center space under either model. Under the sub-metered model, a customer pays us monthly for the power attributable to its equipment in the data center as well as for its ratable allocation of the power used to provide the cooling, lighting, security and other requirements supporting the data center, in each case, at a rate substantially equivalent to our then current cost of electricity. Under the breakered-amp model, a customer pays a fixed monthly fee per committed available ampere of connected power. The extent to which this fixed monthly fee correlates to the monthly amount we pay to our utility provider for electricity at each data center facility varies depending upon the amount of power each customer utilizes each month relative to the amount of committed power purchased.

46


Table of Contents

        During the year ended December 31, 2013, new and expansion leases totaling approximately 235,000 NRSF commenced. The following table provides an overview of our new and expansion data center leasing activity for the periods indicated (in NRSF):

 
  December 31,
2013
  September 30,
2013
  June 30,
2013
  March 31,
2013
 

New and expansion leases signed but not yet commenced at beginning of period

    126,418     140,367     152,240     148,817  

Adjustments(1)

    562         (11 )    

New and expansion leases signed during the period

    26,276     23,294     30,810     42,799  

New and expansion leases signed during the period which have commenced

    (6,918 )   (14,811 )   (13,191 )   (14,679 )

New and expansion leases signed in previous periods which commenced during the period

    (109,134 )   (22,432 )   (29,481 )   (24,697 )
                   

Total leases signed but not yet commenced at end of period

    37,204     126,418     140,367     152,240  

(1)
Adjustments due to a change in the factor used to allocate support space to reflect the current build-out of certain properties. The adjustment does not alter the contractual rent we expect to receive under the affected leases.

        As of December 31, 2013, we had 1,393 leases with over 750 customers, the majority of our leases contained annual base rent escalations that were either fixed (generally ranging from 2% to 5%) or indexed based on a consumer price index or other similar inflation related index.

        Scheduled Lease Expirations.    Our ability to minimize churn and renew expiring leases or otherwise lease vacant space affects our results of operations. The data center leases scheduled to expire in 2014 and 2015 represent approximately 23.1% and 21.1%, respectively, of our annualized rent and 12.3% and 9.8%, respectively, of our stabilized occupied data center NRSF as of December 31, 2013.

        We continue to see demand in our markets for data center space. For the years ended December 31, 2013, rents on re-leased/renewed space increased by an average of 13.3% on a GAAP basis compared to the expiring rents for the same space. Our past performance may not be indicative of future results, and we cannot assure you that leases will be renewed or that our properties will be re-leased at all or at rental rates equal to or above the current average rental rates. Further, re-leased/renewed rental rates in a particular market may not be consistent with rental rates across our portfolio as a whole due to a number of factors, including local real estate conditions, local supply and demand for data center space, the condition of the property and whether the property, or space within the property, has been developed.

        Acquisitions, Development and Financing.    Our ability to grow rental and operating revenue depends on our ability to acquire, develop and lease data center space at favorable rental rates. As of December 31, 2013, we had approximately 946,000 NRSF of future development and under development space or approximately 34% of the total space in our portfolio. We may encounter development delays, excess development costs, or encounter delays in leasing development space to customers. We generally fund the cost of data center development from additional capital, which, for future developments, we would expect to obtain through our revolving credit facility and other unsecured and secured borrowings, construction financings and the issuance of additional equity and debt securities, when market conditions permit. We will require additional capital to finance future development activities, which may not be available or may not be available on terms acceptable to us.

47


Table of Contents

        Conditions in Significant Markets.    Our operating properties are located in San Francisco Bay areas, Los Angeles, Northern Virginia areas, Boston, Chicago, New York, Miami and Denver. These markets comprised 29.8%, 28.7%, 18.2%, 9.4%, 8.4%, 3.6%, 1.3%, and 0.6%, respectively, of our annualized rent as of December 31, 2013. Positive or negative changes in conditions including supply and demand, rental rates, utility costs, and general economic conditions in these markets will impact our overall performance.

Results of Operations

Year Ended December 31, 2013, Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2012

        The discussion below relates to our financial condition and results of operations for the years ended December 31, 2013, and 2012. A summary of our operating results for the years ended December 31, 2013, and 2012, is as follows (in thousands).

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  2013   2012   $ Change   % Change  

Operating revenue

  $ 234,833   $ 206,934   $ 27,899     13.5 %

Operating expense

    200,163     189,891     10,272     5.4 %

Operating income

    34,670     17,043     17,627     103.4 %

Interest expense

    2,689     5,236     (2,547 )   -48.6 %

Net income

    31,612     10,716     20,896     195.0 %

Operating Revenue

        Operating revenue during the years ended December 31, 2013, and 2012, was as follows (in thousands):

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  2013   2012   $ Change   % Change  

Data center revenue:

                         

Rental revenue

  $ 131,080   $ 116,146   $ 14,934     12.9 %

Power revenue

    59,663     53,672     5,991     11.2 %

Interconnection revenue

    28,932     21,637     7,295     33.7 %

Tenant reimbursement and other

    7,317     7,088     229     3.2 %

Office, light industrial and other revenue

    7,841     8,391     (550 )   -6.6 %
                   

Total operating revenues

  $ 234,833   $ 206,934   $ 27,899     13.5 %
                   
                   

        The operating revenue increase was primarily due to a $14.9 million increase in data center rental revenue during the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to 2012. The increase in data center rental revenue is primarily due to the commencement of 235,000 NRSF of new and expansion leases during the year ended December 31, 2013. Included within the 235,000 NRSF are a 19,103 NRSF built-to-suit lease at SV4, which commenced on January 1, 2013, and a 23,663 NRSF lease at BO1, which commenced on April 1, 2013. These two leases increased data center rental revenue by $4.9 million which represents 33% of the total increase in data center rental revenue. The increase was partially offset by lease expirations that were not renewed which resulted in a data center rental revenue churn rate of 7.8% during the year ended December 31, 2013.

        Interconnection revenue increased $7.3 million due to an increase in the volume and pricing of cross connects from new and existing customers during the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to 2012. In addition, power revenue increased $6.0 million during the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to 2012, as a result of the new and expansion leases entered into and the overall increase in occupied NRSF and data center rental revenue.

48


Table of Contents

Operating Expenses

        Operating expenses during the years ended December 31, 2013, and 2012, was as follows (in thousands):

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  2013   2012   $ Change   % Change  

Property operating and maintenance

  $ 64,260   $ 61,235   $ 3,025     4.9 %

Real estate taxes and insurance

    8,458     8,765     (307 )   -3.5 %

Depreciation and amortization

    65,785     64,327     1,458     2.3 %

Sales and marketing

    14,405     10,330     4,075     39.4 %

General and adminstrative

    27,317     25,910     1,407     5.4 %

Rent

    19,659     18,711     948     5.1 %

Transaction costs

    279     613     (334 )   -54.5 %
                   

Total operating expenses

  $ 200,163   $ 189,891   $ 10,272     5.4 %
                   
                   

        The overall increase in operating expenses was primarily due to additional sales and marketing expense of $4.1 million as a result of an increase in payroll and benefits expense due to an increase in the number of sales and marketing employees. During the year ended December 31, 2013, we increased our sales and marketing team to conform to and support the diversified customer base, as well as increase our penetration and deepen our resources in the eight markets where we operate.

        Property operating and maintenance expense increased $3.0 million as a result of an increase in payroll and benefits expense due to the increase in headcount of facilities personnel associated with data center expansion. In addition, power expense increased due to the overall increase in occupancy and customer power draw which is demonstrated by the commencement of 235,000 NRSF of new and expansion leases during the year ended December 31, 2013. These increases were partially offset by $1.5 million of additional capitalized construction personnel salaries as a result of the increase of development activities in our development pipeline during the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to 2012.

        Real estate taxes and insurance decreased as a result of a reduction of accrued real estate taxes associated with estimated amounts from 2010 due to a change in ownership in California. The final tax amounts for certain, but not all, properties became known in the fourth quarter 2013 and, therefore, the estimated accruals were reconciled to the actual expenses, resulting in a $0.3 million reduction in the expense.

        Depreciation and amortization increased $1.5 million as a result of the placement into service of approximately 226,000 NRSF of new operating and pre-stabilized space during the year ended December 31, 2013.

        General and administrative expense increased $1.4 million primarily due to additional payroll and benefits expense as a result of an increase in corporate headcount during the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to 2012. The increases were partially offset by a litigation settlement expense of $1.8 million during the year ended December 31, 2012.

49


Table of Contents

Interest Expense

        The decrease in interest expense was primarily a result of an additional $2.5 million of capitalized interest during the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to 2012, primarily due to the data center developments at NY2, SV5, VA2 and LA2 during the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to December 31, 2012. A summary of interest expense for the years ended December 31, 2013, and 2012, is as follows (in thousands):

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  2013   2012   $ Change   % Change  

Interest expense and fees

  $ 5,312   $ 5,392   $ (80 )   -1.5 %

Amortization of deferred financing costs

    1,739     1,681     58     3.5 %

Capitalized interest

    (4,362 )   (1,837 )   (2,525 )   137.5 %
                   

Total interest expense

  $ 2,689   $ 5,236   $ (2,547 )   -48.6 %
                   
                   

Percent capitalized

    61.9 %   26.0 %            

Year Ended December 31, 2012, Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2011

        The discussion below relates to our financial condition and results of operations for the years ended December 31, 2012, and 2011. A summary of our operating results for the years ended December 31, 2012, and 2011 is as follows (in thousands).

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  2012   2011   $ Change   % Change  

Operating revenue

  $ 206,934   $ 172,846   $ 34,088     19.7 %

Operating expense

    189,891     179,936     9,955     5.5 %

Operating income

    17,043     (7,090 )   24,133     340.4 %

Interest expense

    5,236     5,275     (39 )   -0.7 %

Net income

    10,716     (10,779 )   21,495     199.4 %

Operating Revenue

        Operating revenue during the years ended December 31, 2012, and 2011, was as follows (in thousands):

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  2012   2011   $ Change   % Change  

Data center revenue:

                         

Rental revenue

  $ 116,146   $ 101,449   $ 14,697     14.5 %

Power revenue

    53,672     43,661     10,011     22.9 %

Interconnection revenue

    21,637     12,677     8,960     70.7 %

Tenant reimbursement and other

    7,088     6,610     478     7.2 %

Office, light industrial and other revenue

    8,391     8,449     (58 )   -0.7 %
                   

Total operating revenues

    206,934     172,846   $ 34,088     19.7 %
                   
                   

        The operating revenue increase was primarily due to a $14.7 million increase in data center rental revenue during the year ended December 31, 2012, compared to 2011. The increase in data center rental revenue is primarily due to the commencement of 336 leases comprising 109,059 NRSF of new and expansion leases during the year ended December 31, 2012. The increase was partially offset by lease expirations that were not renewed which resulted in a data center rental revenue churn rate of 8.5% during the year ended December 31, 2012.

50


Table of Contents

        Interconnection revenue increased $9.0 million due to an increase in the volume and pricing of cross connects during the year ended December 31, 2012, compared to 2011. In addition, power revenue increased $10.0 million during the year ended December 31, 2012, compared to 2011, as a result of the new and expansion leases entered into and the overall increase in occupied NRSF and data center rental revenue.

Operating Expenses

        Operating expenses during the years ended December 31, 2012, and 2011, was as follows (in thousands):

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  2012   2011   $ Change   % Change  

Property operating and maintenance

  $ 61,235   $ 55,049   $ 6,186     11.2 %

Real estate taxes and insurance

    8,765     9,119     (354 )   -3.9 %

Depreciation and amortization

    64,327     68,967     (4,640 )   -6.7 %

Sales and marketing

    10,330     5,744     4,586     79.8 %

General and adminstrative

    25,910     21,846     4,064     18.6 %

Rent

    18,711     18,336     375     2.0 %

Transaction costs

    613     875     (262 )   -29.9 %
                   

Total operating expenses

  $ 189,891   $ 179,936   $ 9,955     5.5 %
                   
                   

        The overall increase in operating expenses was primarily due to additional sales and marketing expense of $4.6 million as a result of an increase in payroll and benefits expense associated with internal headcount growth and an increase in the number of sales and marketing employees. During the year ended December 31, 2012, we increased our sales and marketing team to conform to and support our diversified customer base.

        Property operating and maintenance expense increased $6.2 million as a result of an increase in payroll and benefits expense due to the increase in headcount of facilities personnel. In addition, power expense increased due to the overall increase in occupancy and customer power draw which is demonstrated by the commencement of 109,059 NRSF of new and expansion leases during the year ended December 31, 2012.

        Depreciation and amortization decreased $4.6 million as a result of the short-term useful life of the lease intangibles acquired in connection with our IPO that were fully amortized during the years ended December 31, 2012, and 2011.

        General and administrative expense increased $4.1 million primarily as a result of additional payroll and benefits expense from an increase in corporate headcount and a litigation settlement expense of $1.8 million during the year ended December 31, 2012, relating to the settlement of two outstanding litigation matters.

51


Table of Contents

Interest Expense

        Interest expense, including amortization of deferred financing costs, for the year ended December 31, 2012, was $5.2 million compared to interest expense of $5.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2011. The decrease in interest was primarily a result of an increase in capitalized interest due to the number of ongoing development projects partially offset by a higher average debt balance during the year ended December 31, 2012. A summary of interest expense for the years ended December 31, 2012, and 2011, is as follows:

 
  Year Ended
December 31,
   
   
 
 
  2012   2011   $ Change   % Change  

Interest expense and fees

  $ 5,392   $ 5,311   $ 81     1.5 %

Amortization of deferred financing costs

    1,681     1,556     125     8.0 %

Capitalized interest

    (1,837 )   (1,592 )   (245 )   15.4 %
                   

Total interest expense

  $ 5,236   $ 5,275   $ (39 )   -0.7 %
                   
                   

Percent capitalized

    26.0 %   23.2 %            

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Discussion of Cash Flows

Year Ended December 31, 2013, Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2012

        Net cash provided by operating activities was $97.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to $68.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. The increased cash provided by operating activities of $29.1 million, or 42%, was primarily due to the growth in rental, power and interconnection revenue year-over-year from existing customers and completion and subsequent leasing of new data center space at several properties, the receipt of lease incentive payments as a result of lease extensions involving CoreSite as the lessee, a decrease in interest expense as a result of the lower average debt balance and increased capitalized interest, partially offset by an increase in operating expenses and leasing commissions as a result of new and expansion and lease renewals and development of internal-use software.

        Net cash used in investing activities increased by $130.7 million to $214.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to $83.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. This increase was primarily a result of the acquisition of NY2 for $21.9 million and cash invested in data center development projects at SV5, NY2, and VA2, where approximately 200,000 NRSF was under construction during the year ended December 31, 2013.

        Net cash provided by financing activities was $113.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2013, compared to $16.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2012. The increase in cash provided by financing activities of $97.3 million was primarily a result of draws on our revolving credit facility of $174.3 million during year ended December 31, 2013 and $57.1 million of mortgage loans repaid during the year ended December 31, 2012. The increase was partially offset by $115.0 million proceeds received from the issuance of Series A Preferred Stock during the year ended December 31, 2012, and a $24.0 million increase in dividends and distributions paid on our common stock and Operating Partnership units and dividends paid on preferred stock during the year ended December 31, 2013.

Analysis of Liquidity and Capital Resources

        We have an effective shelf registration statement that allows us to offer for sale unspecified various classes of equity and debt securities. As circumstances warrant, we may issue debt and/or equity from time to time on an opportunistic basis, dependent upon market conditions and available pricing.

52


Table of Contents

        Our short-term liquidity requirements primarily consist of funds needed for future distributions to common and preferred stockholders and holders of our common operating partnership units, interest expense, operating costs including utilities, site maintenance costs, real estate and personal property taxes, insurance, rental expenses and selling, general and administrative expenses and certain capital expenditures, including for the development of data center space during the next twelve months. As of December 31, 2013, we had $5.3 million of cash and equivalents, excluding $0.2 million of restricted cash. Subject to our ability to obtain capital with favorable terms, we estimate our anticipated development activity over the next twelve months will require approximately $115 million to $145 million of investment to expand our operating data center portfolio. Our anticipated development activity is primarily comprised of the current projects under development and additional projects that may commence development in 2014 depending on various market conditions.

        We expect to meet our short-term liquidity requirements through net cash provided by operations and by incurring additional indebtedness, including drawing on our revolving credit facility or other unsecured debt. During the year ended December 31, 2013, we entered into a Second Amended and Restated Credit Agreement for our revolving credit facility and partially exercised the accordion feature to increase the aggregate commitments of our borrowing capacity to $405.0 million. The accordion feature allows our Operating Partnership to increase the total commitment to $500.0 million, under specified circumstances. The total amount available for borrowings under our revolving credit facility is subject to the lesser of the facility amount or the availability calculated on our unencumbered asset pool. As of December 31, 2013, $174.3 million of borrowings were outstanding and we have up to $222.4 million of borrowing capacity under our revolving credit facility. Our ability to borrow under our revolving credit facility is subject to ongoing compliance with a number of financial covenants and other customary restrictive covenants. As of December 31, 2013, we were in compliance with the covenants under our revolving credit facility.

        In order to increase our liquidity requirements and access to capital and meet the needs of our development plans, our Operating Partnership and certain subsidiaries entered into a $100.0 million senior unsecured term loan on January 31, 2014. The senior unsecured term loan has a five-year term and contains an accordion feature, which allows our Operating Partnership to increase the total commitments by $100.0 million, to $200.0 million, under specified circumstances. Our Operating Partnership used the proceeds from the senior unsecured term loan to repay the $58.3 million SV1 mortgage loan in its entirety and pay down a portion of its outstanding revolving credit facility balance. Including the subsequent partial repayment of the revolving credit facility, we have the ability to borrow approximately $264 million under the revolving credit facility.

        Our long-term liquidity requirements primarily consist of the costs to fund the development of additional phases of our current projects under development, including the Santa Clara Campus, the One Wilshire Campus, VA2 and NY2, future development of other space in our portfolio not currently scheduled, property acquisitions, future distributions to common and preferred stockholders and holders of our common operating partnership units, scheduled debt maturities and capital improvements. We expect to meet our long-term liquidity requirements through net cash provided by operations, after paying for dividends, and by incurring long-term indebtedness, such as property mortgage loans, and drawing on our revolving credit facility. We also may raise capital in the future through the issuance of additional equity or debt securities, subject to prevailing market conditions, and/or through the issuance of common operating partnership units. However, there is no assurance that we will be able to successfully raise additional capital on acceptable terms or at all.

53


Table of Contents

Inflation

        Substantially all of our leases contain annual rent increases and have an average lease term of three to four years. As a result, we believe that we are largely insulated from the effects of inflation. However, any increases in the costs of development of our data center properties will generally result in increased cash requirements to develop our data center properties and increased depreciation expense in future periods, and, in some circumstances, we may not be able to directly pass along the increase in these development costs to our customers in the form of higher rents.

Indebtedness

        A summary of outstanding indebtedness as of December 31, 2013 and 2012 is as follows (in thousands):

 
  Interest Rate   Maturity
Date
  December 31,
2013
  December 31,
2012
 

SV1—Mortgage loan

  3.67% and 3.71% at December 31, 2013, and December 31, 2012, respectively   Repaid on January 31, 2014   $ 58,250   $ 59,750  

Revolving credit facility

  2.17% and 2.46% at December 31, 2013, and December 31, 2012, respectively   January 3, 2017     174,250      
                   

Total principal outstanding

          $ 232,500   $ 59,750  
                   
                   

        As of December 31, 2013, we were in compliance with the covenants under our revolving credit facility and the SV1 mortgage loan. On January 31, 2014, our Operating Partnership and certain subsidiaries entered into a $100.0 million senior unsecured term loan. For additional information with respect to the senior unsecured term loan, our outstanding indebtedness as of December 31, 2013, and December 31, 2012, as well as the available credit under our existing revolving credit facility, debt covenant requirements, and future debt maturities, refer to Item 8—Note 8—Debt in "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" included in the Annual Report.

Contractual Obligations

        The following table summarizes our contractual obligations and off-balance sheet arrangements as of December 31, 2013, including the maturities and scheduled principal repayments of indebtedness (in thousands):

Obligation
  2014   2015   2016   2017   2018   Thereafter   Total  

Operating leases

  $ 19,028   $ 19,388   $ 19,076   $ 17,641   $ 15,975   $ 64,918   $ 156,026  

Credit Facility(1)

    3,778     3,778     3,778     174,250             185,584  

SV1—Mortgage loan(2)

    59,887                         59,887  

Construction contracts(3)

    28,869                         28,869  

Other(4)

    1,984     1,089     582     194     118     1,659     5,626  
                               

Total

  $ 113,546   $ 24,255   $ 23,436   $ 192,085   $ 16,093   $ 66,577   $ 435,992  
                               
                               

(1)
Includes $174.3 million outstanding and estimated annual interest payments assuming no draws or payments on the revolving credit facility through the maturity date of January 3, 2017. The revolving credit facility is subject to variable rates and we estimated interest payments based on the interest rate as of December 31, 2013.

54


Table of Contents

(2)
Includes $58.3 million of mortgage principal payments and estimated interest payments until debt maturity on October 9, 2014. We estimated interest payments of $1.6 million in 2014. The mortgage payable is subject to variable rates and we estimated interest payments based on the interest rate as of December 31, 2013. On January 31, 2014, the SV1 mortgage loan was repaid in its entirety using the proceeds from the senior unsecured term loan.

(3)
Obligations for construction contracts for properties under construction, tenant related capital expenditures, and other capital improvements.

(4)
Obligations for power contracts, telecommunications leases, and internal system development.

        As part of our 2012 acquisition of Comfluent, a Denver, Colorado based data center operator, the former owner was hired and is compensated based upon successfully renewing and increasing revenue relating to the customer base that existed at the date of acquisition. We currently estimate this amount to be $8.0 million, assuming all customers are renewed beyond January 2015. We currently have $1.2 million accrued as a leasing commission related to those customers that were renewed as of December 31, 2013.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

        As of December 31, 2013, the Company did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements.

Critical Accounting Policies

        Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles ("GAAP"). The preparation of these consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amount of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Our actual results may differ from these estimates. We have provided a summary of our significant accounting policies in Note 2 "Summary of Significant Accounting Policies in "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data" included in this Annual Report. We describe below those accounting policies that require material subjective or complex judgments and that have the most significant impact on our financial condition and results of operations. Our management evaluates these estimates on an ongoing basis, based upon information currently available and on various assumptions management believes are reasonable as of the date hereof.

        Acquisition of Investment in Real Estate.    We apply purchase accounting to the assets and liabilities related to all of our real estate investments acquired. Accordingly, we are required to make subjective assessments to allocate the purchase price paid to the acquired tangible assets, consisting primarily of land, building and improvements, and identified intangible assets and liabilities, consisting of the value of above-market and below-market leases and lease origination costs. These allocation assessments involve significant judgment and complex calculations and have a direct impact on our results of operations.

        Capitalization of Costs.    Capitalized lease commissions consist of commissions paid to third party leasing agents and internal sales commissions paid to employees for the successful execution of lease agreements. We also capitalize a portion of internal sales employees' compensation and payroll-related fringe benefits that directly relate to time spent executing successful lease agreements. During the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012, and 2011, we capitalized $3.9 million, $2.7, million, and $2.3 million, respectively, of internal sales commissions, salaries, and payroll-related fringe benefits.

55


Table of Contents

        Direct and indirect costs that are clearly associated with the development of properties are capitalized as incurred. During the land development and construction periods, we capitalize construction costs, legal fees, financing costs (including interest), real estate taxes and insurance and internal costs of personnel performing development, if such costs are incremental and identifiable to a specific development project. We cease cost capitalization on development space once the space is ready for its intended use and held available for occupancy. Indirect costs that do not clearly relate to the projects under development are not capitalized and are charged to expense as incurred. Indirect costs capitalized for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012, and 2011, are as follows (in thousands):

 
  Year Ended December 31,  
 
  2013   2012   2011  

Interest

  $ 4,362   $ 1,837   $ 1,591  

Real estate taxes and insurance

    1,473     732     432  

Employee salaries and benefits

    2,447     957     741  
               

Capitalized indirect development costs

  $ 8,282   $ 3,526   $ 2,764  
               
               

        Useful Lives of Assets.    We are required to make subjective assessments as to the useful lives of our properties for purposes of determining the amount of depreciation to record on an annual basis with respect to our investments in real estate. These assessments have a direct impact on our net income. Buildings are depreciated on a straight-line basis over 27 to 40 years. Additionally we depreciate building improvements over ten years for owned properties and the remaining term of the original lease for leased properties. Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter of the lease term or useful life of the asset.

        Recoverability of Long-Lived Assets.    We review the carrying value of our properties for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Impairment is recognized when estimated expected future cash flows (undiscounted and without interest charges) from an asset are less than the carrying amount of the asset. The estimation of expected future net cash flows is inherently uncertain and relies to a considerable extent on assumptions regarding current and future economic and market conditions and the availability of capital. If, in future periods, there are changes in the estimates or assumptions incorporated into an impairment review analysis, these changes could result in an adjustment to the carrying amount of our assets. To the extent that impairment has occurred, the excess of the carrying amount of the property over its estimated fair value would be charged against net income. No such impairment losses have been recognized to date.

        Revenue Recognition.    Rental income is recognized on a straight-line basis over the noncancelable term of customer leases. The excess of rents recognized over amounts contractually due pursuant to the underlying leases are recorded as deferred rent receivable on our consolidated balance sheets. Many of our leases contain provisions under which our customers reimburse us for a portion of direct operating expenses, including power, as well as real estate taxes and insurance. Such reimbursements are recognized in the period that the expenses are recognized. We recognize the amortization of the acquired above-market and below-market leases as decreases and increases, respectively, to rental revenue over the remaining noncancelable term of the underlying leases. If the value of below-market leases includes renewal option periods, we include such renewal periods in the amortization period utilized.

        Interconnection, utility services, and additional space services are considered separate earnings processes that are typically provided and completed on a month-to-month basis and revenue is recognized in the period that the services are performed. Non-recurring customer set-up charges and utility installation fees are initially deferred and recognized over the lease term or the expected period of performance unless management determines a separate earnings process exists related to an installation charge.

56


Table of Contents

        On October 1, 2013, we established standard contracts for nonrecurring charges, including utility installation services and additional space services, in order to streamline transaction processing and simplify customer pricing, thereby taking on more of the risks and rewards associated with the delivery of these services and products. CoreSite started accounting for utility installation services and additional space services on a gross basis within the consolidated statement of operations because we now act as the primarily obligor and bear substantially all of the risks and rewards associated with the utility installation services and additional space services. In prior periods, where we did not bear substantially all of the risks and rewards associated with the utility installation services and additional space services, these transactions were accounted for on a net basis within the consolidated statements of operations. For the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012, and 2011, CoreSite presented $2.1 million, $2.6 million, and $1.7 million, respectively, of revenue from utility installation fees and additional space services net of $1.9 million, $2.2 million, and $1.2 million of costs as operating revenue within the consolidated statements of operations.

        We must make subjective estimates as to when our revenue is earned and the collectability of our accounts receivable related to rent, deferred rent, expense reimbursements and other income. We analyze individual accounts receivable and historical bad debts, customer concentrations, customer creditworthiness and current economic trends when evaluating the adequacy of the allowance for bad debts. These estimates have a direct impact on our net income because a higher bad debt allowance would result in lower net income and recognizing rental revenue as earned in one period versus another would result in higher or lower net income for a particular period.

        Share-Based Awards.    We generally recognize compensation expense related to share-based awards on a straight-line basis over the vesting period of the award. The calculation of the fair value of share-based awards is subjective and requires several assumptions over such items as expected stock volatility, dividend payments and interest rates. These assumptions have a direct impact on our net income because a higher share-based awards amount would result in lower net income for a particular period.

ITEM 7A.    QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

        Market risk refers to the risk of loss from adverse changes in market prices and interest rates. The primary market risk to which we believe we are exposed is interest rate risk. Our future income, cash flows and fair values relevant to financial instruments are dependent upon prevalent market interest rates. Many factors, including governmental monetary and tax policies, domestic and international economic and political considerations and other factors that are beyond our control contribute to interest rate risk.

        As of December 31, 2013, we had $232.5 million of consolidated indebtedness that bore interest at variable rates. We monitor our market risk exposures using a sensitivity analysis. Our sensitivity analysis estimates the exposure to market risk sensitive instruments assuming a hypothetical 1% change in year-end interest rates and excludes consideration of interest capitalized. If interest rates were to increase by 1%, the increase in interest expense on our variable rate debt would decrease future net income and cash flows by approximately $2.3 million annually. If interest rates were to decrease by 1%, the decrease in interest expense on the variable rate debt would be approximately $2.3 million annually.

        These analyses do not consider the effect of any change in overall economic activity that could impact interest rates. Further, in the event of a change of that magnitude, we may take actions to further mitigate our exposure to interest rates. However, due to the uncertainty of the specific actions that would be taken and their possible effects, these analyses assume no changes in our financial structure.

57


Table of Contents

ITEM 8.    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

INDEX TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Consolidated Financial Statements of CoreSite Realty Corporation

 
  Page No.  

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

    59  

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2013, and 2012

   
61
 

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012, and 2011

   
62
 

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income (Loss) for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012, and 2011

   
63
 

Consolidated Statements of Equity for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012, and 2011

   
64
 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2013, 2012, and 2011

   
65
 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

   
66
 

Supplemental Schedule—Schedule III—Real Estate and Accumulated Depreciation

   
88
 

58


Table of Contents


Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The Board of Directors and Stockholders
CoreSite Realty Corporation:

        We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of CoreSite Realty Corporation and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2013 and 2012, and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income (loss), equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2013. In connection with our audits of the consolidated financial statements, we also have audited the related financial statement schedule, Schedule III—Real Estate and Accumulated Depreciation. We also have audited CoreSite Realty Corporation's internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2013, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework (1992) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). CoreSite Realty Corporation's management is responsible for these consolidated financial statements and the related financial statement schedule, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management's Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements and the related financial statement schedule and an opinion on CoreSite Realty Corporation's internal control over financial reporting based on our audits.

        We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audits of the consolidated financial statements included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.

        A company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company's internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

        Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

59


Table of Contents

        In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of CoreSite Realty Corporation and subsidiaries as of December 31, 2013 and 2012, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2013, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, Schedule III—Real Estate and Accumulated Depreciation, when considered in relation to the basic consolidated financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein. Also in our opinion, CoreSite Realty Corporation maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2013, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework (1992) issued by COSO.

 

/s/ KPMG LLP

Denver, Colorado
February 14, 2014

60


Table of Contents


CORESITE REALTY CORPORATION

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(in thousands except share data)

 
  December 31,
2013
  December 31,
2012
 

ASSETS

             

Investments in real estate:

             

Land

  $ 78,983   $ 85,868  

Building and building improvements

    717,007     596,405  

Leasehold improvements

    95,218     85,907  
           

    891,208     768,180  

Less: Accumulated depreciation and amortization

    (155,704 )   (105,433 )
           

Net investment in operating properties

    735,504     662,747  

Construction in progress

    157,317     61,328  
           

Net investments in real estate

    892,821     724,075  

Cash and cash equivalents

    5,313     8,130  

Accounts and other receivables, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $159 and $625 as of December 31, 2013, and 2012, respectively

    10,339     9,901  

Lease intangibles, net of accumulated amortization of $17,646 and $33,050 as of December 31, 2013, and 2012, respectively

    11,028     19,453  

Goodwill

    41,191